Spain, San Simón & Duch updates

Shipping & Transport

Contributed by San Simón & Duch
Maritime privileged credits under Insolvency Act
  • Spain
  • January 11 2017

The Insolvency Act is based on the principle of universality with regard to assets and liabilities. However, certain credits – including maritime privileged credits – must be separated from a bankruptcy estate, resulting in a breach of this principle. Ultimately, if a maritime privileged credit is exercised against the ship of a party undergoing bankruptcy proceedings, the creditor or owner of the credit can separate the ship from the bankruptcy estate if the liquidation of assets phase has yet to commence.

Jurisdiction clauses in bills of lading
  • Spain
  • December 07 2016

The Spanish courts have increasingly dismissed cargo claims brought by cargo owners or their subrogated underwriters, citing a lack of jurisdiction due to the inclusion of a jurisdiction clause in the bill of lading. However, in some cases, the courts have followed this trend without performing a strict analysis of the jurisdiction clause in question, thereby accepting clauses of questionable validity.

Dealing with goods abandoned at ports
  • Spain
  • July 06 2016

The Community Customs Code states that the 'abandonment' of goods must be carried out in accordance with national provisions and must not cause harm to public funds. The Navigation Act and the Police Regulations, Rules and Service Ports govern the treatment of goods abandoned in port service areas.

SOLAS amendment: is Spain ready for July 1 2016?
  • Spain
  • May 25 2016

On July 1 2016 an amendment to the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea will take effect, requiring verification of the gross mass of packed containers prior to loading on board ships. From that date, any container leaving from any port in the world must be accompanied by a new document signed by the shipper listing the verified gross mass of the container. But is Spain ready for this?

Supreme Court finds master, owner and insurer liable for oil spill
  • Spain
  • February 10 2016

The sinking of the Prestige in 2002 resulted in a catastrophic oil spill. While all defendants were originally acquitted of criminal offences against the environment, several parties appealed the decision. In a controversial recent judgment, the Supreme Court ruled that the Prestige's master, owner and insurer were civilly liable for the damage to the environment.


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