Employment & Benefits updates


New draft laws could affect employment contracts
  • Argentina
  • May 25 2016

Two new draft laws were recently published which will directly affect employment contracts if passed. The first proposes introducing benefits for employees regarding the recruitment of workers aged between 16 and 24 and the regularisation of non-registered employees. The second proposes a temporary ban on dismissals in the public and private sectors without just cause.

Income tax under fire
  • Argentina
  • March 30 2016

The government recently enacted Decree 394/16, which increases the tax-free minimum salary, favouring pensioners and unionised employees. However, the taxation of severance payments in cases of dismissal without cause is a contentious issue for the tax authorities and taxpayers and there has been significant increase in claims for income tax withheld from employees on the termination of employment.


Contributed by Lander & Rogers
How to avoid business relocation blues
  • Australia
  • March 21 2018

A growing workforce, strategic expansion or the end of a lease can force businesses to relocate their premises or employees. While such changes are often positive, relocation can pose a number of practical and legal issues that should be carefully negotiated in order to minimise disruption to the business and employees and reduce exposure to employment-related claims. Two recent unfair dismissal decisions provide useful guidance on business relocation.

A guide to handling #metoo in the workplace
  • Australia
  • March 14 2018

The #metoo movement has helped to expose the prevalence of sexual harassment in society, particularly in the workplace. While the spotlight has been on individuals working in Hollywood's film and television industry, a 2012 survey by the Australian Human Rights Commission found that 25% of women in Australia had been sexually harassed at work. Three key tips can help employers to support gender equality, prevent sexual harassment in the workplace and ensure that no one is alienated in the process.

Employee entitlements: no leave accrued during lock-out
  • Australia
  • February 28 2018

For 74 days in 2017 Carter Holt Harvey Woodproducts Australia Pty Ltd 'locked out' a number of its employees from the workplace during an industrial dispute. The Fair Work Commission was called on to resolve a dispute over whether employees who had been locked out during the industrial action were entitled to accrue annual leave and long service leave during the lock-out.

Uber driver fails to convince Fair Work Commission of employment relationship
  • Australia
  • February 07 2018

The Fair Work Commission recently rejected an Uber driver's claim of unfair dismissal on the grounds that he was an employee, upholding Uber's argument that he was instead an independent contractor. It stated that the fundamental elements of an employment relationship were absent from the relationship between the parties, as the driver was not required to perform work or provide services for the benefit of Uber, and Uber made no payments to the driver for the provision of any work or services.

The bully-er or the bullied?
  • Australia
  • January 31 2018

The Fair Work Commission's bullying jurisdiction recently rejected an aged care worker's bullying claim against her supervisors and managers. The employer successfully argued that, at all times, the employee was subject to reasonable management action carried out in a reasonable manner. This case demonstrates that bullying is not always top-down; it can be horizontal or even bottom-up.


Contributed by Graf & Pitkowitz Rechtsanwälte GmbH
Accurate and complimentary – difficult standard for recommendation letters
  • Austria
  • February 07 2018

Under Austrian law, a recommendation letter must be truthful and cannot contain language that would aggravate the professional advancement of the employee. When truthfulness would result in less than lavish praise, employers must resort to a short-form recommendation letter, devoid of any information beyond the type of work performed and the duration of employment. This alternative, although accurate in its lack of praise, can aggravate an employee's career prospects.

Blue-collar and white-collar employees – sweetening the deal
  • Austria
  • December 06 2017

In its final session before the general election, Parliament passed a bill which serves as a first step in harmonising the different legal regimes covering blue-collar and white-collar employees. However, not everyone is happy with this half-hearted harmonisation project – most notably, employer organisations – as they believe that the extended notice period for blue-collar workers will cost employers dearly.

Up in smoke: new law favours non-smokers in pub over workplace
  • Austria
  • October 04 2017

As of May 1 2018 smoking in restaurants and bars will be prohibited. The restrictions on smoking in the workplace will also be tightened as of this date. However, the new provisions still afford some leeway to employers in that they can organise smoking breakrooms. As a consequence, the workplace may be more smoker friendly than pubs – who would have imagined that.

Vocational reintegration through novel part-time model
  • Austria
  • July 26 2017

New legislation recently came into effect that aims to ease the process of reintegration into the workplace for employees who have been on extended sick leave and who would benefit from a reduced workload in order to aid rehabilitation and reconnect with the workplace. Although it is a well-meant initiative to curb the increase in long-term sickness, the legal framework reveals some major flaws.

2017 brings improvements for works councils and older employees
  • Austria
  • April 26 2017

Two recent amendments to the Labour Relations Act benefit the legal status of works councils and are geared towards increasing older employees' job prospects. In particular, the term of office for members of a works council has been extended from four to five years. Works council members' entitlement to educational leave has also been extended. Further, the special treatment of employees who start employment at age 50 or older has been abolished.


Contributed by Mattos Filho, Veiga Filho, Marrey Jr e Quiroga Advogados
Impact of labour reform on awards paid to employees
  • Brazil
  • February 07 2018

The discussion regarding the legal nature of awards is not new to Brazilian labour courts, especially because amounts paid as awards could be considered salary, obliging the employer to include the award in the employee's salary and pay him or her every month or include this amount as a basis for determining the employee's labour rights. The legislative branch has tried to clarify this matter, defining the legal nature of awards, as well as the concept and legal criteria for their application.

Outsourcing and impact of labour reform
  • Brazil
  • November 08 2017

The use of outsourcing has historically been uncertain in Brazil, particularly in relation to the outsourcing of a company's core business. However, once in force, the labour reform will create a scenario of greater legal certainty for outsourcing because it expressly authorises the outsourcing of any activities, including a company's core business.

Buyers' liability for labour debts
  • Brazil
  • October 25 2017

According to a precedent established by the Superior Labour Court, the acquiring company is not liable for the labour debts of other companies within a corporate group that encompasses the acquired company, provided that the entities – at the time of the transaction – were creditworthy or economically viable, except in the case of bad faith or fraud. However, a recent reform to the Labour Code will enter into force in November 2017 and may change the existing understanding in this regard.

Labour reform: equal treatment for litigating parties
  • Brazil
  • September 20 2017

The need to modernise the procedural rules applicable to the labour procedure has long been a concern in Brazil. As such, it was well known that labour relations were being modernised and that the law did not satisfactorily account for this progress. In light of this, the newly enacted Law 13,467/2017 will introduce, among several changes not seen in prior legislative amendments, equal treatment of litigating parties and greater legal certainty for both litigating parties and Brazilian society as a whole.

Labour reform: what do you need to know?
  • Brazil
  • August 16 2017

The recently approved labour reform has amended several articles of the Labour Code and Laws 6,019/1974 (temporary employment), 8,036/90 (severance fund) and 8,212/1991 (social contributions). The legislation still protects the constitutional rights of workers. However, it seeks to modernise labour relations by creating rules and defining concepts which allow workers, companies and unions to have more freedom to negotiate their rights.

British Virgin Islands

Legislation to change work permit fee calculation enacted
  • British Virgin Islands
  • August 09 2017

The government recently enacted a measure regarding the fees payable for work permits in the British Virgin Islands. The amendment order replaces the employee flat fee system with an incremental calculation based on salary bands, which now generally assume a higher gross salary. It also replaces most exceptions to the previous scheme, keeping only those for domestic workers.