Mr Marco Turnquest

Marco Turnquest

Lawyer biography

Marco is a Partner in firm’s Litigation and Insolvency and Restructuring Groups. Marco although being a general all around litigator he is regularly involved in complex commercial litigation with a particular emphasis on shareholder and insolvency disputes.

Marco studied Law and Politics at the University of Keele in Staffordshire, England, where he graduated with a Bachelor of Laws (LLB) in 1999. He then successfully completed the Bar Vocational Course at the Inns of Court School of Law in London, England, following which he was called to Bar of England and  Wales as a member of the Honourable Society of Middle Temple in June, 2000, and to the Bahamian Bar  in October, 2000.

Marco joined Lennox Paton as an Associate in 2000 and was made a Partner in 2006.

Over the years Marco has been involved in a number of large commercial cases, with an international element, which have been litigated in The Bahamas. He regularly appears as lead counsel or junior counsel in the Supreme Court and Court of Appeal of The Bahamas.

Areas of Expertise

  • Litigation
  • Insolvency and Restructuring

Updates

Arbitration & ADR

Supreme Court identifies its jurisdictional limits to assist in trust arbitration proceedings
Bahamas | 05 September 2019

The Supreme Court recently clarified its jurisdictional limits to assist in trust-related arbitrations, ruling that it has no such jurisdiction to allow service outside an action's jurisdiction. Given this ruling, parties to trust arbitration agreements must be cognisant that, notwithstanding whether their trust deeds provide for the seat of any arbitration to be The Bahamas, the court can provide only limited assistance where the arbitration is not held and the parties or assets are not in The Bahamas.

Litigation

Supreme Court identifies its jurisdictional limits to assist in trust arbitration proceedings
Bahamas | 03 September 2019

The Supreme Court recently clarified its jurisdictional limits to assist in trust-related arbitrations, ruling that it has no such jurisdiction to allow service outside an action's jurisdiction. Given this ruling, parties to trust arbitration agreements must be cognisant that, notwithstanding whether their trust deeds provide for the seat of any arbitration to be The Bahamas, the court can provide only limited assistance where the arbitration is not held and the parties or assets are not in The Bahamas.

Court of Appeal confirms 'no leave to appeal' ruling
Bahamas | 02 August 2011

Crawford International recently appealed a judgment relating to the determination of a preliminary issue concerning the scope of a management contract. A preliminary objection was taken to the appeal on the basis that the judgment was interlocutory and no leave to appeal had been obtained. However, the appeal court determined that the judgment on the preliminary issue was final rather than interlocutory, and as such no leave was required.

Private Client & Offshore Services

Supreme Court identifies its jurisdictional limits to assist in trust arbitration proceedings
Bahamas | 29 August 2019

The Supreme Court recently clarified its jurisdictional limits to assist in trust-related arbitrations, ruling that it has no such jurisdiction to allow service outside an action's jurisdiction. Given this ruling, parties to trust arbitration agreements must be cognisant that, notwithstanding whether their trust deeds provide for the seat of any arbitration to be The Bahamas, the court can provide only limited assistance where the arbitration is not held and the parties or assets are not in The Bahamas.

Privy Council clarifies Bahamian law on appealing interlocutory judgments
Bahamas | 15 June 2017

There has been some debate over the lack of clarity regarding the concurrent jurisdiction of the Supreme Court and the Court of Appeal as to where and when applications for leave to appeal and stays should be made. A recent Judicial Committee of the Privy Council ruling has clarified this area of the law and given attorneys clear guidance regarding the proper procedure for appealing interlocutory judgments and applying for a stay pending appeal in the Bahamas.

Judicial and Legal Services Commission: obligation to consider applications
Bahamas | 29 September 2011

In early 2011 Cheryl Grant-Bethel, the former Deputy Directory of Public Prosecutions, brought a case against John Delaney QC in relation to the Judicial and Legal Services Commission's failure to consider her application to be appointed director of public prosecutions. The case raised a number of important and novel issues relating to the obligations of the commission to consider applications for legal positions in the civil service.

Court of Appeal confirms 'no leave to appeal' ruling
Bahamas | 04 August 2011

Crawford International recently appealed a judgment relating to the determination of a preliminary issue concerning the scope of a management contract. A preliminary objection was taken to the appeal on the basis that the judgment was interlocutory and no leave to appeal had been obtained. However, the appeal court determined that the judgment on the preliminary issue was final rather than interlocutory, and as such no leave was required.