Latest updates

Publication of cybersecurity threat information subject to government approval
AnJie Law Firm
  • Tech, Data, Telecoms & Media
  • China
  • 24 January 2020

The Cyberspace Administration of China recently published the Administration Measures for Releasing Cybersecurity Threat Information (Draft for Comments) to solicit public opinions. According to the draft measures, the publication of cybersecurity threat information must be reported to regulators in a number of specific circumstances.

No worms for early birds? Lexitor and Austrian implementation of EU Consumer Credit Directive
Schima Mayer Starlinger
  • Banking
  • Austria
  • 24 January 2020

Considering the obvious conflict with European Court of Justice case law, the Austrian legislature's aim to fully implement the EU Consumer Credit Directive and the Austrian Consumer Credit Act's intended (but directive-breaching) effects consumers, legal advisers and the courts are now confronted with the delicate question of how consumer requests for repayment should be dealt with.

CFIUS 2.0: expansion of jurisdictional scope remains in limbo as tech minority investments emerge
Arent Fox LLP
  • International Trade
  • USA
  • 24 January 2020

In the Foreign Investment Risk Review Modernisation Act and the Export Control Reform Act, Congress essentially gave the Department of Commerce the authority to decide how narrowly or widely to set the jurisdiction for the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States over non-passive minority investments involving emerging and foundational technologies. Yet, at times, the department has seemed almost paralysed by this question.

Lending market review 2019
Ali Budiardjo, Nugroho, Reksodiputro
  • Banking
  • Indonesia
  • 24 January 2020

Fintech-based lending in Indonesia grew rapidly in 2019. Various crowdfunding models (in particular, peer-to-peer lending) emerged and gave the regulatory authorities a new focus for their attention. In this regard, the Financial Services Authority issued a number of new regulations concerning equity funding, digital financial innovation in the financial services sector, standing facilities, money markets and open operations.

Personal Information Protection Commission – recent trends
Nagashima Ohno & Tsunematsu
  • Tech, Data, Telecoms & Media
  • Japan
  • 24 January 2020

In recent months, the Personal Information Protection Commission (PPC) has been proactive in publicising cases of data breaches that have had a significant social impact, together with the names of the companies, even when the PPC did not exercise its supervisory authority over the companies in question. Whether this trend will continue should be carefully monitored.

Washington State to try again for comprehensive privacy law
Hogan Lovells
  • Tech, Data, Telecoms & Media
  • USA
  • 24 January 2020

The Washington Privacy Act (WPA) gained significant traction in the legislature in 2019, passing the state Senate almost unanimously, but ultimately failing in the state House of Representatives due to discussions around facial recognition and compliance challenges. State Senator Reuven Carlyle has now released a revised draft of the WPA for 2020. If enacted as drafted, this new version of the WPA would come into effect on 31 July 2021.

Pension scheme amendments
Carey Olsen Bermuda
  • Private Client & Offshore Services
  • Bermuda
  • 23 January 2020

Provisions of the National Pension Scheme (Occupational Pensions) Amendment Act 2019 recently came into force. Employers should now be familiar with some of the upcoming changes, which include the requirement to keep records in relation to payroll and employee-related pension information.

KPPU flexes muscles with revamped merger control guidelines
Ali Budiardjo, Nugroho, Reksodiputro
  • Competition & Antitrust
  • Indonesia
  • 23 January 2020

After fining numerous companies for late notification of mergers, consolidations and acquisitions in recent months, the new commissioners of the Indonesian Competition Commission who took office in May 2018 have once again shown their commitment to a more active enforcement of merger control rules by introducing new merger control guidelines.

Antitrust in China – 2019 in review
AnJie Law Firm
  • Competition & Antitrust
  • China
  • 23 January 2020

China's antitrust enforcement agencies were reorganised in 2018. As such, new legislation and enforcement actions in 2019 attracted significant attention from practitioners and in-house counsel, with a view to gaining an insight into the new agency's enforcement trends and priorities (if any). This article underlines the most significant developments in legislation, public enforcement and private litigation in 2019.

Court of Appeal dispenses with service of enforcement of arbitral award against sovereign state
Clifford Chance
  • Arbitration & ADR
  • United Kingdom
  • 23 January 2020

The Court of Appeal recently considered whether service of formal court documentation on a state party was a necessary requirement when seeking to enforce an arbitral award against it or whether service could be dispensed with in certain circumstances. The significant judgment will have implications for cases in which it may be very difficult to enact service of enforcement proceedings on a state through diplomatic channels.

New Arbitration Law eradicates dual system
Rato, Ling, Lei & Cortés Advogados
  • Private Client & Offshore Services
  • Macau
  • 23 January 2020

The new Arbitration Bill was approved in general terms by the Legislative Assembly in 2018 and voted into law in November 2019. Once the New Arbitration Law enters into force in May 2020, Macau's dual arbitration system will cease to exist. This legislative cohesion is likely to encourage foreign investors and partners to choose Macau as their jurisdiction for disputes and strengthen its arbitration credentials internationally.

Supreme Court judgment on legality of consortium agreement
Gorrissen Federspiel
  • Competition & Antitrust
  • Denmark
  • 23 January 2020

The Supreme Court recently rendered a much-anticipated judgment on the legality of consortium agreements under competition law. The court repealed a Maritime and Commercial High Court decision from 2018 in a case concerning a consortium agreement between two companies regarding their joint bid on a public tender for road marking work. This ruling marks an increasingly restrictive practice, which may affect forms for cooperation other than consortia.

Vegans protected by Equality Act: what does it mean for employers?
Lewis Silkin
  • Employment & Benefits
  • United Kingdom
  • 22 January 2020

According to an employment tribunal in the widely reported case brought by Jordi Casamitjana, ethical veganism can be a philosophical belief that is protected under the Equality Act. But what does this mean in practice for employers?

Theft of tobacco from trailer not covered under cargo insurance as transport had not commenced
WSCO Advokatpartnerselskab
  • Shipping & Transport
  • Denmark
  • 22 January 2020

The Maritime and Commercial Court recently examined whether the theft of tobacco products was covered under the cargo policy agreed between a wholesaler and a carrier and whether the wholesaler's insurer was liable. It is clear from the judgment that cargo insurance coverage under the Danish Extended Conditions requires that the transport of insured goods commences immediately after loading onto the means of transport has taken place.

Shipping project finance: new regulatory intricacies
Wikborg Rein
  • Shipping & Transport
  • Norway
  • 22 January 2020

Project financing has historically been a popular investment scheme and source of capital in Norway for shipping projects. However, the Norwegian regulatory authorities recently published guidelines regarding the application of the alternative investment fund (AIF) regime to project finance entities. Issuers, advisers, arrangers and investors in shipping projects must be aware of the pitfalls of being captured by the wide definition of an 'AIF' and the steps that they can take in order to adapt to the regulations.

Employer breaches duty of good faith and honest performance: now what?
Fasken
  • Employment & Benefits
  • Canada
  • 22 January 2020

Employers have a duty of good faith when they terminate an employee, which requires them to be honest and forthright with employees when doing so. The law has also developed to recognise a duty to perform a contract honestly and in good faith. The Supreme Court is now deciding what happens when an employer breaches that duty. Should a court award an employee money for incentive compensation that they would have expected to receive had it not been for the breach?

Disabled mother dismissed: disability and gender discrimination at work contravenes law
Norrbom Vinding
  • Employment & Benefits
  • Denmark
  • 22 January 2020

A district court has confirmed a 2018 Equal Treatment Board finding that the dismissal of a female wheelchair user who had just returned from maternity leave contravened the Anti-discrimination Act and the Act on Equal Treatment of Men and Women. The decision emphasises that employers which implement redundancies for operational reasons for employees with disabilities should always be able to explain in detail why it is the employee with the disability who is a candidate for redundancy.

French Aircraft Registry: mortgagees must now elect domicile in Evry
Odi-se Avocats
  • Aviation
  • France
  • 22 January 2020

The French Civil Aviation Authority's Registration Office recently moved from Paris to Athis-Mons. As a result, aircraft mortgage beneficiaries must elect domicile in the jurisdiction of the Evry Tribunal de Grande Instance. This will not prove too difficult for French banks, which may elect domicile at a branch in the Court of Evry's territorial jurisdiction; however, foreign lenders and non-banking mortgagees will have to find someone (eg, a notary) who will accept such election of domicile on their behalf.

Drink or work: a choice must be made
Castegnaro
  • Employment & Benefits
  • Luxembourg
  • 22 January 2020

Employees may drink a small glass of alcohol in the workplace, whether at after-work events or professional lunches or during festivities organised by the company. However, what happens if an employee arrives at work intoxicated? The Court of Appeal was recently confronted with such a situation and had to consider the conditions under which an employee's state of intoxication can justify their dismissal.

High Court decision offers guidance on interpreting guarantees
Wikborg Rein
  • Shipping & Transport
  • United Kingdom
  • 22 January 2020

A recent High Court decision provided guidance on the rules of interpretation when construing guarantees that display characteristics of both on-demand and true guarantees. The case concerned a charterer guarantee, which was described as a parent company guarantee and had characteristics of both an on-demand guarantee and a true guarantee.

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