Netherlands, AKD The Netherlands updates

Intellectual Property

Contributed by AKD The Netherlands
Not all alterations of architectural works result in infringements of moral rights
  • Netherlands
  • 29 April 2019

The Supreme Court recently issued a long-awaited decision on an architect's moral rights of paternity and integrity. In recent years, several Dutch judgments have considered whether architects can oppose changes to their original building designs. The Supreme Court's decision further clarifies that it is difficult for architects to do so where the changes are necessary to alter a building's function.

Assessing the real risk of market partitioning and the burden of proof
  • Netherlands
  • 15 February 2016

A recent interlocutory judgment on assessing the real risk of market partitioning in an unauthorised parallel import case examined the rationale for reversing the burden of proof and whether the risk of partitioning assessment should take place retroactively or not. Rights holders will welcome the judgment because of the high standard it sets for what evidence qualifies as proof of a real risk of market partitioning.

Communication to the public: how much involvement is required?
  • Netherlands
  • 14 December 2015

The Supreme Court has referred another question to the European Court of Justice regarding 'communication to the public' as defined by the EU Infosoc Directive. The referral concerns a dispute between anti-piracy association the BREIN Foundation and two internet service providers hosting the notorious online index of digital content, The Pirate Bay.

Hyperlinks and copyright: courts seek ECJ guidance
  • Netherlands
  • 16 November 2015

The relationship between hyperlinking and copyright has been the subject of various court judgments. The outcome of such cases depends on the accessibility of the content, whether the content was uploaded lawfully, whether the link qualifies as a communication to the public and whether the rights holder's permission was obtained. Dutch courts recently made two new references to the European Court of Justice on this issue.

Copyright Contract Law comes into force
  • Netherlands
  • 03 August 2015

The new Copyright Contract Law was recently inserted into the Copyright Act 1912. The amendment aims to strengthen the position of authors, particularly in relation to parties which exploit their works (eg, publishers, film producers and record companies). The new law requires a signed deed in relation to exclusive licences, as well as introducing a section on exploitation contracts into the act.


Litigation

Contributed by AKD The Netherlands
Not all alterations of architectural works result in infringements of moral rights
  • Netherlands
  • 30 April 2019

The Supreme Court recently issued a long-awaited decision on an architect's moral rights of paternity and integrity. In recent years, several Dutch judgments have considered whether architects can oppose changes to their original building designs. The Supreme Court's decision further clarifies that it is difficult for architects to do so where the changes are necessary to alter a building's function.

Legislature introduces possibility to claim mass damages in collective action proceedings
  • Netherlands
  • 23 April 2019

The Senate recently adopted the Bill on Redress of Mass Damages in Collective Actions (RMDCA). The RMDCA enables representative entities to claim monetary compensation on behalf of their constituents, which provides aggrieved parties with more effective means of redress. The RMDCA also introduces stricter requirements regarding the admissibility of representative entities and the scope of collective action proceedings, along with other procedural changes.

Volume guarantees under transport and logistics contracts
  • Netherlands
  • 02 April 2019

A recent Utrecht District Court decision sends a strong reminder to parties in the transport and logistics industry that they must be precise and clear about what they are agreeing to in dealings with their trading partners. While the less formal requirements for concluding an agreement under Dutch law seem to benefit the transport industry, this decision shows that there are pitfalls to be considered.

Rotterdam court rules in favour of Petrobras investors by accepting jurisdiction
  • Netherlands
  • 26 February 2019

The Rotterdam District Court recently assumed jurisdiction over the international securities class action lawsuit against Petrobras Brasileiro SA and others in the Netherlands. The judgment offers valuable insight into how the Dutch courts assess jurisdiction in cross-border collective redress cases. It also illustrates that the Netherlands could act as a collective redress venue in matters relating to events that mainly take place in foreign jurisdictions.

Hema crocodile takes bite out of Lacoste trademark
  • Netherlands
  • 19 February 2019

The Hague District Court recently issued a preliminary ruling in which it held that Lacoste could not invoke its famous crocodile trademark in order to prohibit the use of a crocodile motif on children's underwear. This preliminary judgment is one of only a few examples in which the use of a sign has been considered purely decorative (and thus could not be perceived as trademark use). Typically, the courts are restrictive in accepting such a defence.


Shipping & Transport

Contributed by AKD The Netherlands
Understanding legal position of digital logistics platforms
  • Netherlands
  • 22 May 2019

Digital platforms which connect logistics service providers with their customers have become commonplace. A relevant question from a legal perspective is whether such a platform acts as a carrier or freight forwarder. The answer to this question will affect a platform's civil and public law exposure. As such, platforms should consider their legal position carefully.

Volume guarantees under transport and logistics contracts
  • Netherlands
  • 27 March 2019

A recent Utrecht District Court decision sends a strong reminder to parties in the transport and logistics industry that they must be precise and clear about what they are agreeing to in dealings with their trading partners. While the less formal requirements for concluding an agreement under Dutch law seem to benefit the transport industry, this decision shows that there are pitfalls to be considered.

Onus on party seeking to limit liability to provide all information at early stage
  • Netherlands
  • 12 December 2018

A recent decision by the Rotterdam Court regarding a major oil spill in the port of Rotterdam emphasises the importance of assessing at an early stage which liability regime applies when a party seeks to limit its exposure to claims in the event of an oil spill at sea. The court held that in procedures concerning limitation of liability, it is the responsibility of the party seeking to rely on limitation to provide all of the information available at an early stage.

Supreme Court confirms right to limit liability
  • Netherlands
  • 08 August 2018

The Supreme Court has reconfirmed the right to limit liability under Dutch law, even in personal injury cases. It held that limitation as such is not a violation of the human right to protection of property under the First Protocol to the European Convention on Human Rights, and that it is nationally and internationally considered necessary that the liability of the carrier is limited or may be limited in the event of a passenger's death or personal injury.

Netherlands prepares to adopt Rotterdam Rules
  • Netherlands
  • 01 August 2018

With two bills recently submitted to Parliament, the Netherlands is preparing to adopt the United Nations Convention on Contracts for the International Carriage of Goods Wholly or Partly by Sea (the Rotterdam Rules) into Dutch law. This legislative effort is a clear sign of support in respect of the rules and will be appreciated by those convinced that the rules are the way forward for the carriage of goods in this age of e-commerce.


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