Intellectual Property, Bryn Aarflot AS updates

Norway

Contributed by Bryn Aarflot AS
Protection of plant varieties under plant breeders' rights
  • Norway
  • 14 June 2021

Plant breeders' rights provide protection of plant varieties. In Norway, where such protection is granted by the Plant Variety Board, breeders can prevent third parties from producing or importing plant material of their plant variety with a view to offering it for sale or otherwise marketing it for purposes of propagation. Third parties must also obtain permission from the breeder if they intend to commercially produce cut flowers or ornamental material by reproducing protected propagation material or plants.

Trademark litigation: FAQs
  • Norway
  • 07 June 2021

In Norway, the Trademark Act 2010 regulates the registration, administrative opposition, cancellation and invalidation proceedings regarding trademarks. As well as the formal procedural requirements, the Trademark Act also contains the material requirements for trademark registration. This article answers FAQs about trademark litigation in Norway.

Trademark prosecution: FAQs
  • Norway
  • 24 May 2021

In Norway, the Trademark Act 2010 regulates the registration, administrative opposition, cancellation and invalidation proceedings regarding trademarks. As well as the formal procedural requirements, the Trademark Act also contains the material requirements for trademark registration. This article answers FAQs about trademark prosecution in Norway.

Patent litigation: FAQs
  • Norway
  • 17 May 2021

The Patent Act constitutes the basic legislative framework regarding patents and their extent under Norwegian law. The Patent Act and its accompanying rules regulate the filing, formalities and substantive examination of patent applications and the registration, administrative opposition, cancellation and invalidation of granted patents. This article answers FAQs about patent litigation in Norway.

Implementation of new Customs Act
  • Norway
  • 10 May 2021

By 1 July 2021 a new Customs Act will be implemented in Norway, with simplified procedures relating to the destruction of consignments which contain counterfeit goods. The amendments aim to align Norwegian customs control with EU regulations and practice. For IP owners, the new procedures are long overdue and will be welcomed. Under the new rules, counterfeit goods are more likely to be detained and destroyed, which in turn may result in fewer attempts to import counterfeit products overall.


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