Latest updates

Jurisdictional challenges to arbitral awards: raise them before they're gone
Dentons
  • Litigation
  • Canada
  • 21 May 2019

The Ontario Superior Court of Justice recently provided a comprehensive judicial review of a jurisdictional challenge to an arbitral award. This decision will be of interest not only to car manufacturers, but also to most parties subject to an arbitration agreement. However, the broader takeaway from this case is that non-compliance with the Arbitration Act is not a ground for review. Therefore, jurisdictional challenges must be brought at the beginning of hearings.

New Jersey agreements with employees: new law leaves nowhere to hide
Dentons US LLP
  • Employment & Benefits
  • USA
  • 15 May 2019

Senate Bill 121 has amended New Jersey's longstanding Law Against Discrimination to prohibit any contractual provision that conceals "the details relating to a claim of discrimination, retaliation, or harassment". Notably, the new law applies to all existing and future agreements, except collective bargaining agreements. The law also preserves the enforceability of certain restrictive covenants, including non-competition agreements and provisions protecting confidential and proprietary information.

Summary judgment applications: analysing Weir-Jones and its application in BF
Dentons
  • Litigation
  • Canada
  • 14 May 2019

The Alberta Court of Appeal recently clarified the test for summary judgment applications. The court noted the rift that has emerged in case law while discussing the standard of proof that is required in a summary judgment application. In particular, it held that the reliance on the conventional trial no longer reflects modern reality and must be readjusted in favour of more proportionate, timely and affordable procedures.

Who's the boss? US DOL attempts to clarify joint employment rule under Fair Labour Standards Act
Dentons US LLP
  • Employment & Benefits
  • USA
  • 08 May 2019

The Department of Labour has issued proposed revisions to the definition of 'joint employer' under the Fair Labour Standards Act in order to clarify the joint employer relationship. The joint employment rule allows multiple employers to be responsible for paying hours worked by a shared employee under certain circumstances.

Court dismisses statutory misrepresentation claim against credit union board in landmark decision
Dentons
  • Litigation
  • Canada
  • 07 May 2019

For the first time, the Ontario Superior Court of Justice has released a decision that considers issues of statutory misrepresentation in an offering statement under the Credit Unions and Caisses Populaires Act 1994. Given the limited jurisprudence in this area, this landmark decision is expected to provide valuable guidance to boards and insurers on risk prevention.

Court of appeal refuses to reinstate jail sentence… this time
Dentons
  • Litigation
  • Canada
  • 30 April 2019

The Ontario Court of Appeal recently provided clarity on the sentencing principles in Occupational Health and Safety Act cases. The court clarified that just because jail terms are rare does not mean that they should not be imposed. In its decision, the court discussed the principles of sentencing for regulatory offences at length and recognised the primacy of fines over incarceration in sentencing (ie, in most cases, fines will be more appropriate than jail time).

Time may not be of the essence when considering specific performance
Dentons
  • Litigation
  • Canada
  • 23 April 2019

The Ontario Superior Court of Justice recently outlined when specific performance will be available in a real estate transaction. This decision is a stark reminder of the pitfalls of acting both in bad faith and without diligence in respect of such a transaction. It is also a reminder that a party to an agreement of purchase and sale cannot insist that time is of the essence if (among other things) it breaches the agreement and does not act in good faith.

Third-party discoverability grounded in reasonability
Dentons
  • Litigation
  • Canada
  • 16 April 2019

In negligence-based actions, defendants routinely issue third-party claims for contribution and indemnity to reduce their liability exposure. As a result, a plaintiff can commence a claim believing certain defendants to have caused its loss but, after successive third-party claims, learn that several other persons might have contributed to the loss. The Ontario Superior Court recently reviewed the law of discoverability with respect to third parties.

Need for speed: get your anti-suit injunction fast!
Dentons Rodyk
  • Arbitration & ADR
  • Singapore
  • 11 April 2019

Parties entering into arbitration agreements ordinarily abide by their contractually chosen dispute resolution mechanism and proceed accordingly. However, counterparties sometimes start proceedings in a foreign jurisdiction in breach of an arbitration clause. A recent Singapore Court of Appeal decision sets out firm guidance that a party that finds itself in this scenario should act as fast as possible to restrain the counterparty by way of an anti-suit injunction.

R v Barra: timely but qualified success for corruption of foreign public officials regime
Dentons
  • Litigation
  • Canada
  • 09 April 2019

In R v Barra the Ontario Superior Court of Justice convicted two businesspeople on charges of bribing foreign public officials in India. This judgment appears to have crept under the radar, but is notable in the context of the enforcement of the Corruption of Foreign Public Officials Act because of the court's views on who is a foreign public official and the requirement that the Crown prove that the accused had knowledge of this status.

Ontario Superior Court of Justice confirms new tort for public disclosure of private facts
Dentons
  • Litigation
  • Canada
  • 19 March 2019

The Ontario Superior Court of Justice recently released a significant decision that expands occupiers' liability for violence on their premises and affirms a new privacy tort that censures the publication of aspects of an individual's private life without their consent. The decision establishes a novel cause of action for claims arising from the distribution of an individual's private information – in this case, a sexually explicit video of the plaintiff without her knowledge or consent.

Doctrine of unjust enrichment may deprive named beneficiaries of life insurance proceeds
Dentons
  • Litigation
  • Canada
  • 12 March 2019

Designated beneficiaries of a life insurance policy have traditionally had a high degree of certainty that they would be entitled to the policy proceeds on the death of the insured. However, this certainty has been jeopardised by a recent Supreme Court of Canada case where a former wife's prior contractual claim to the proceeds of her former husband's life insurance policy precluded his common-law spouse's entitlement to the proceeds as the irrevocable beneficiary.

Company wound up in record time despite claims that dispute was subject to arbitration
Dentons Rodyk
  • Arbitration & ADR
  • Singapore
  • 07 February 2019

In a recent High Court judgment, the plaintiff successfully imposed a winding-up order on a debtor company six weeks after the service of a statutory demand for an underlying debt of $250 million. This decision is an important comment on the standard of proof required for a debtor company to show that there is a dispute – and therefore stave off winding-up proceedings by a creditor – where the underlying contract is subject to arbitration.

When cyber fraud strikes: delineating coverage if employees are duped
Dentons
  • Litigation
  • Canada
  • 29 January 2019

The recent growth and sophistication of modern fraud and cybersecurity attacks have necessitated adaptable countermeasures by for-profit and non-profit organisations. Of these countermeasures, the emergence of niche cybercrime and fraud insurance (eg, cyber liability insurance) has given credence to the ethos that cybersecurity breaches are not a matter of if but when. A recent case considered the limits of a funds transfer fraud policy and highlights the importance of reading insurance policies carefully.

Reasonable notice damages for wrongful dismissal cannot be determined via summary judgment
Dentons
  • Litigation
  • Canada
  • 15 January 2019

A recent Court of Queen's Bench of Alberta decision provides clarity amidst the conflicting jurisprudential landscape regarding whether the assessment of damages for a termination without cause is appropriate for summary judgment. The court supported a master's finding that an assessment of damages for pay in lieu of reasonable notice for wrongful dismissal is inappropriate for summary judgment.

Apportionment of liability under workers' compensation scheme
Dentons
  • Litigation
  • Canada
  • 08 January 2019

A recent case examined the apportionment of liability for damages between multiple defendants where at least one of them is statutorily immune from liability. The court considered whether an employer can be held vicariously liable for damages caused by its employee's negligence when the injured party, the employee and the employer are subject to the Workers' Compensation Act.

Court upholds owner's discretion to select contractor based on overall cost, schedule and experience
Dentons
  • Litigation
  • Canada
  • 18 December 2018

The Alberta Court of Appeal recently ruled on the tendering of a contract that will be of interest to owners and contractors alike. The court upheld an owner's right to rely on privilege and discretion clauses and a description of the relevant evaluation criteria in the tender documents, as well as its right to take a nuanced view of the costs to choose the contractor that it considered best suited to the project.

British Columbia court looks past unregistered trading in ordering payment to investment finder
Dentons
  • Litigation
  • Canada
  • 11 December 2018

For many junior resource company executives, deciding whether to engage investment finders can be like considering whether to breathe air. Such companies tend to have early-stage projects that do not warrant debt financing and therefore need equity injections, but lack the profile needed to attract traditional investment dealers. However, working with finders entails navigating the 'exempt' market, which can be hazardous to the ill-informed.

Court of appeal decides WSIB fraud requires wilful act
Dentons
  • Litigation
  • Canada
  • 04 December 2018

The Workplace Safety and Insurance Board (WSIB) recently prosecuted three workers who were receiving WSIB benefits for failing to report a material change with respect to their benefit entitlement. The WSIB argued that it was not required to prove that the workers had intended to defraud the board. However, the Ontario Court of Appeal disagreed and held that to obtain a conviction for failing to report a material change, prosecutors must prove something akin to tax evasion or fraud.

Court hits brakes on duties owed to intoxicated plaintiffs
Dentons
  • Litigation
  • Canada
  • 27 November 2018

The expansion of recognised duties of care owed to intoxicated persons recently met resistance from the Ontario Superior Court of Justice. The plaintiff in the case was one of four intoxicated passengers in a taxi who had been injured after the taxi was involved in an accident. The court centred its decision on the evidentiary record in the case, which established no reasonable basis for the plaintiff's expectation that the taxi driver would ensure that he wore his seatbelt.