Arbitration & ADR, Canada updates

Attempting to consolidate arbitral and non-arbitrable disputes can compromise arbitration agreements
  • Canada
  • 28 March 2019

The Ontario Superior Court recently considered the application and operability of an arbitration clause in a subcontract in the context of a related claims proceeding under a related main contract. The case highlights the challenges involved in drafting pre-dispute arbitration clauses that will operate effectively when multiple claims arise between multiple parties under multiple contracts.

Court of appeal declares notice to arbitrate null due to its attempt to achieve consolidation without consent
  • Canada
  • 17 January 2019

The British Columbia Court of Appeal recently declared a notice to arbitrate a nullity because it sought to commence four separate arbitrations against three different parties under four separate arbitration agreements. Practitioners and parties entering into multiple contracts relating to the same subject matter or project should consider whether it is desirable to have all potential disputes which arise under the multiple contracts arbitrated in one proceeding.

Consolidation of arbitration proceedings without consent: cautionary tale
  • Canada
  • 06 December 2018

In a decision that is inconsistent with the weight of Canadian and international jurisprudence, the Court of Queen's Bench of Alberta recently ordered the consolidation of arbitration proceedings without the consent of all parties. For now, parties and practitioners should be aware that arbitrations seated in Alberta may be subject to consolidation without consent.

Court clarifies when international arbitral awards become binding
  • Canada
  • 27 September 2018

The Ontario Court of Appeal recently interpreted when an international commercial arbitration award becomes binding on the parties for the purposes of judicial recognition and enforcement of foreign arbitral awards. It held that the determination of whether an award is binding pursuant to Articles 35 and 36 of the United Nations Commission on International Trade Law Model Law rests with the court rather than the arbitral tribunal.

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