Latest updates

Supreme Court finds dismissal unlawful due to use of investigator to monitor job performance
Stanchi Studio Legale
  • Employment & Benefits
  • Italy
  • July 18 2018

The Supreme Court recently found that a dismissal for just cause is unlawful if the employer uses an investigator to monitor an employee's job performance. The ban on the use of investigative agencies also applies to activities carried out by employees off their employer's premises and renders investigative reports unusable unless they concern behaviour that suggests criminal activity.

Got the gig? Worker classification in gig economy heats up
Lander & Rogers
  • Employment & Benefits
  • Australia
  • July 18 2018

The line between employee and contractor continues to be blurred in the gig economy. To avoid litigation, companies must determine how to classify workers. The Fair Work Ombudsman has launched legal proceedings against a food delivery business, Foodora, on the basis that it treats its workers as independent contractors rather than employees. While the gig economy awaits the outcome of the case, what should employers be doing in the meantime?

Rare diseases and orphan drugs – regulation needed
Fırat Izgi Attorney Partnership
  • Healthcare & Life Sciences
  • Turkey
  • July 18 2018

Orphan medicinal products are used to prevent and treat rare diseases. However, approximately 95% of all rare diseases are yet to be treated effectively. Although access to medicinal products has improved, this remains an issue in the treatment of rare diseases. R&D in this field requires investment because these products appeal to a limited number of patient populations and R&D processes are long and costly.

Recent changes to employment law affect business operations
Lee & Ko
  • Employment & Benefits
  • South Korea
  • July 18 2018

South Korea recently overhauled its employment laws. Some of the most significant changes that may have an impact on business operations concern annual paid leave entitlements and fertility treatment leave, eligibility for childcare leave, protection for workplace sexual harassment victims, mandatory disability awareness training and the scope of the anti-discrimination statutes.

Too hot to handle? What employers should know about a heatwave
Lewis Silkin
  • Employment & Benefits
  • United Kingdom
  • July 18 2018

Over the past few months, the United Kingdom has gone from shivering in sub-zero temperatures to experiencing one of the hottest summers on record. Although the sun may be more welcome than the snow, it can still cause headaches for employers. As such, there are a number of factors that they should keep in mind when the mercury starts rising.

Red Compartida: president launches major telecoms project
Hogan Lovells BSTL SC
  • Telecoms
  • Mexico
  • July 18 2018

The president recently launched the Red Compartida (or Shared Network), which is one of the most important projects being undertaken in the Mexican telecoms sector. The project involves a new mobile broadband network in the 700 MHz band, which will provide wholesale services under a public-private partnership structure between Altán Redes and the government. The project aims to provide mobile broadband coverage to 92.2% of the Mexican population by 2024.

How to reduce absenteeism
CMS Albiñana & Suárez de Lezo
  • Employment & Benefits
  • Spain
  • July 18 2018

Absenteeism costs Spanish companies approximately €77 billion a year and has become such a pressing issue that the Ministry of Finance has announced measures to combat it in the public sector. Companies must be proactive in implementing measures and controls to reduce absenteeism in order to raise employee awareness of such impact and enable them to avoid the implementation of coercive measures.

Parliament passes new Working Time Act
Graf & Pitkowitz Rechtsanwälte GmbH
  • Employment & Benefits
  • Austria
  • July 18 2018

Parliament recently passed a new law that brings sweeping changes to the Working Time Act and will come into effect on 1 September 2018. The law – which was heavily debated in the media and caused much controversy among the 'social partnership' (the Austrian system for cooperation between the two sides of industry) – sets the stage for more flexibility in a changing work environment.

New regulations governing post-market oversight of opioids
Smart & Biggar/Fetherstonhaugh
  • Healthcare & Life Sciences
  • Canada
  • July 18 2018

As part of a federal initiative to address the opioid crisis, the Regulations Amending the Food and Drug Regulations (Opioids) recently came into force, adding post-market oversight of prescription opioids. The minister of health can now impose terms and conditions on the market authorisation for listed opioids. The amendments also introduce a mandatory warning sticker and patient information handout for 'Class A' opioids (as set out in Part A of the List of Opioids).

Arbitration now permitted for employment disputes
Mattos Filho, Veiga Filho, Marrey Jr e Quiroga Advogados
  • Employment & Benefits
  • Brazil
  • July 18 2018

The recent labour and employment reform enacted in Brazil has introduced important changes to labour and employment relations. One of the principal changes is the introduction of arbitration for the resolution of employment disputes. Although the changing law requires a change of mindset, employers should take advantage of it and begin to consider the possibility of instituting arbitration for certain employment contracts.

New Brunswick to include workplace violence and harassment in health and safety legislation
Fasken
  • Employment & Benefits
  • Canada
  • July 18 2018

The New Brunswick government has introduced draft legislation amending the General Regulation 91-191, made under the Occupational Health and Safety Act, to include provisions regarding workplace violence and harassment. The amendments will require employers to establish a written code of practice, conduct a workplace violence risk assessment and develop measures and procedures for incident reporting, investigations and summoning immediate assistance.

PMPRB forming working group on guideline reform
Smart & Biggar/Fetherstonhaugh
  • Healthcare & Life Sciences
  • Canada
  • July 18 2018

The Patented Medicine Prices Review Board (PMPRB) recently announced that the next step in its guideline reform will be the inception of a multi-stakeholder working group intended to gather stakeholder input on key technical aspects of the new regime. The PMPRB anticipates concurrently releasing more specific guidance on how it foresees putting the anticipated regulatory changes into operation.

Surprise decision regarding changing case law
OBLIN Attorneys at Law
  • Litigation
  • Austria
  • July 17 2018

The Supreme Court recently ruled that even settled case law can change. The law prevents the retroactive application only of statutory laws, not court decisions. Therefore, changes in case law also apply retroactively, as there is no ban on the retroactive application of legal knowledge by the courts. The interest in maintaining 'correct' case law overrides earlier protections afforded to those applying the law; thus, it is paramount to be prepared for changes in case law.

CONDUSEF amends rules on good practices, transparency and advertising for insurers
Hogan Lovells BSTL SC
  • Insurance
  • Mexico
  • July 17 2018

The National Commission for the Protection and Defence of Users of Financial Services (CONDUSEF) recently amended the General Rules on Good Practices, Transparency and Advertising applicable to Insurance Companies. The amendments have added additional documents to the contractual documentation required for insurance adhesion contracts and provided the form on which insurers must include the registry numbers granted by the National Insurance and Bonds Commission and CONDUSEF.

Israel bond financing of US commercial real estate – an overview
Fischer Behar Chen Well Orion & Co
  • Capital Markets
  • Israel
  • July 17 2018

Israel has seen a growing trend in debt initial public offerings by US and Canadian real estate companies with income-producing real estate, as well as in the listing of the bonds for trading on the Tel Aviv Stock Exchange. In recent years, more than 30 such real estate companies have completed public debt offerings in Israel, the large majority of which were initial public offerings.

No costs entitlement without lawyer's invoice – parties using in-house lawyers lose entitlement to costs
Wilson Harle
  • Litigation
  • New Zealand
  • July 17 2018

Since 1983 it has been the position in New Zealand that a party can recover costs in cases where it has been represented by a lawyer that it employed. However, a recent Christchurch High Court decision held that this is no longer the case. The decision will have a significant impact on entities which are routinely represented in court proceedings by in-house lawyers.

Brazilian legal system: civil law sprinkled with common law elements
TozziniFreire Advogados
  • Litigation
  • Brazil
  • July 17 2018

Even though Brazil is a civil law country, the New Civil Procedure Code of 2015 has brought elements of common law jurisdictions to the Brazilian courts. Certain precedents rendered by the Supreme Court and the Superior Court of Justice – the country's highest courts for constitutional and federal law issues, respectively – are now binding on the lower courts.

Security for costs – a foreign affair
  • Litigation
  • Cayman Islands
  • July 17 2018

During the early stages of litigation, a well-advised defendant will consider how to enforce a Cayman Islands court costs order in the foreign jurisdiction where the claimant's assets are located, and whether it should seek security from the claimant for the costs of doing so. The Court of Appeal has recently considered whether a foreign claimant should give security limited to the costs of enforcing an order in the foreign jurisdiction only or for the (much greater) amount of defending the appeal.

Rise of private health insurance: challenges and opportunities
AnJie Law Firm
  • Insurance
  • China
  • July 17 2018

Despite a range of stakeholders having vested interests in developing the private health insurance market, it has remained underdeveloped and is generally considered by Chinese insurers to be unprofitable compared with life insurance lines. Insurers have also found it hard to stimulate uptake by a consumer base that is relatively unfamiliar with the added value of such products. As such, the Chinese health insurance market is not as mature, innovative or profitable as it could be.

Distracted by mobile phones: forklift operators guilty of occupational health and safety offence
Dentons
  • Litigation
  • Canada
  • July 17 2018

Two forklift operators were recently found guilty under the Occupational Health and Safety Act for using mobile phones while sitting on their forklifts. The court held that "operating or using" a forklift includes sitting on a forklift even when it is stopped and turned off, as other workers and forklifts may be nearby and put at risk by the operator's distraction and inattention to their surroundings while using a mobile phone. Further, the employer had clearly prohibited the use of mobile phones in the warehouse.

Current search

Refine search

Work area

Jurisdiction

Firm