Latest updates

Regulations on Network Eco-governance issued for public comment
AnJie Law Firm
  • Tech, Data, Telecoms & Media
  • China
  • 18 October 2019

The Cyberspace Administration of China recently published the draft Regulations on Network Eco-governance for public consultation. The regulations apply to the actions of network information content producers, network information content service platforms and network information content service users, which are prohibited from producing illegal or harmful information.

Supreme Court redefines location surcharge in rent control leases
Graf & Pitkowitz Rechtsanwalte GmbH
  • Real Estate
  • Austria
  • 18 October 2019

In early 2019 the Supreme Court passed three decisions confirming and clarifying its 2017 decision which had limited landlords' right to request a location surcharge for rent-controlled apartments in desirable neighbourhoods. Based on the court's judgment, approximately 100,000 apartments no longer qualify for the location surcharge. However, the court's vague criteria for determining whether a neighbourhood is considered above or below average leave scope to include additional indicators.

Amorphous human rights due diligence for US exporters of surveillance items
Arent Fox LLP
  • International Trade
  • USA
  • 18 October 2019

The US State Department recently solicited feedback on its draft US Government Guidance for the Export of Hardware, Software and Technology with Surveillance Capabilities and/or Parts/Know-How. The draft guidance aims to provide insight to exporters on the considerations to weigh prior to exporting items with intended and unintended surveillance capabilities and could foreshadow new export controls and a US State Department review.

Effect of EU preventive restructuring directive on Belgian insolvency framework
ALTIUS
  • Insolvency & Restructuring
  • Belgium
  • 18 October 2019

A number of legislative changes to Book XX of the Code of Economic Law may be required following the adoption of EU Directive 2019/1023/EU on preventive restructuring frameworks. This article focuses on the directive's potential effect on Book XX with regard to debtors in possession, the duration of moratoria, the suspension of enforcement during moratoria, the suspension and termination of ongoing contracts, the cramdown of creditors and the acceptance of reorganisation plans.

Non-possessory floating pledge: new floating charge under Italian law
Legance – Avvocati Associati
  • Banking
  • Italy
  • 18 October 2019

A recent reform introduced a non-possessory floating pledge to the Italian legal framework. Under the reform, the perfection of such security can take place without the delivery of a pledged asset to the secured creditor, thus introducing an important exception to the general legal framework. Similar to the floating charge structure, the absence of a dispossession requirement enables entrepreneurs to retain the availability of collateral which can be used in the course of the productive cycle.

No deal? Post-Brexit admission of British nationals to Swiss labour market
Lenz & Staehelin
  • Immigration
  • Switzerland
  • 18 October 2019

The Agreement on Admission to the Labour Market for a Temporary Transitional Period following the Withdrawal of the United Kingdom from the European Union and the Free Movement of Persons will provide facilitated access to the labour market for British nationals in Switzerland and for Swiss nationals in the United Kingdom after Brexit. The agreement will serve as a transition regime in the event of a no-deal Brexit and would be entered into for a limited period until 31 December 2020.

Data protection and cyber-risk issues in arbitration: regulation, cyberattacks and hacked evidence
Norton Rose Fulbright
  • Arbitration & ADR
  • International
  • 17 October 2019

Data protection and cybersecurity are hot topics in international arbitration and international surveys demonstrate that users of arbitration are concerned about data security. While there are signs that the market is listening, users seem to think that institutions, counsel and tribunals could do more to address cybersecurity. As these issues become more common, it is hoped that consistent practices will emerge to reassure users that their data will be secure.

CPC fines snack distributor for unfair solicitation of customers
Schoenherr
  • Competition & Antitrust
  • Bulgaria
  • 17 October 2019

The Commission on the Protection of Competition (CPC) recently fined a snack distributor 4% of its annual turnover for the unfair solicitation of customers. The commission relied on its earlier practice to determine whether a promotional campaign launched by the distributor had infringed the Competition Protection Act. This decision is a helpful reminder that in order to avoid competition law violations, companies must carefully consider which prizes to offer in promotional campaigns.

High court rules that non-parties to arbitration are not bound by confidentiality
Shearn Delamore & Co
  • Arbitration & ADR
  • Malaysia
  • 17 October 2019

A high court recently ruled that the prohibition against third parties publishing, disclosing or communicating information relating to arbitration proceedings does not extend to non-parties to an arbitration. This decision will affect the extent to which the confidential documents used in arbitral proceedings remain confidential.

Fraud claims in letter of guarantee not subject to arbitration clause in underlying contract
Global Law Office
  • Arbitration & ADR
  • China
  • 17 October 2019

An independent letter of guarantee involves a legal relationship between the applicant, the issuer and the beneficiary. Without an arbitration clause in a letter of guarantee, it is unclear whether the arbitration clause in the underlying contract can also bind the issuer. A recent Supreme People's Court ruling provides a clear answer to this question.

Recent developments regarding attorney-client privilege
Nagashima Ohno & Tsunematsu
  • Competition & Antitrust
  • Japan
  • 17 October 2019

According to the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), Japan is one of only three OECD jurisdictions to not recognise attorney-client privilege. In response to discussions and lobbying, the Diet has announced amendments to the Anti-monopoly Law which will partially introduce attorney-client privilege in administrative investigations pursuant to ordinances under the law or certain prescribed guidelines.

Outsourcing: a new paradigm
CGM Advogados
  • Employment & Benefits
  • Brazil
  • 16 October 2019

In a recent decision, the Supreme Court addressed an important question relating to the day-to-day activities of companies operating in Brazil: is the outsourcing of services allowed without restriction or should it be limited to non-core business activities, as set out by Precedent 331 of the Superior Labour Court? This decision is relevant because it will affect the standards adopted by the Brazilian labour courts in relation to outsourcing.

Gateway to The Bahamas: runway rehabilitation project
Callenders & Co
  • Aviation
  • Bahamas
  • 16 October 2019

In recent years, there has been significant growth in air traffic to and from The Bahamas. As a result, the government has taken proactive steps to support this growth – notably, with upgrades to several of the country's busiest airports. For example, the Nassau Airport Development Company recently commenced a major rehabilitation project at the Lynden Pindling International Airport. This project will, among other things, include an asphalt upgrade to increase the runway's lifespan.

New crowdfunding platform regulations
Gorodissky & Partners
  • Corporate Finance/M&A
  • Russia
  • 16 October 2019

The president recently signed Federal Law 259-FZ of 2 August 2019 on Raising Investments via Investment Platforms and on Amending Certain Legislative Acts of the Russian Federation. The law, which is set to take effect from 1 January 2020, reflects the growing trend in Russia of increased regulation of digital economy issues.

Discounted tariffs: change of legal position?
Arnecke Sibeth Dabelstein
  • Aviation
  • Germany
  • 16 October 2019

A recent Frankfurt am Main Local Court decision is a useful reminder that in the event of an assertion of claims under the EU Flight Delay Compensation Regulation, the associated booking conditions must be considered when determining claim validity. Ultimately, travellers with access to corporate customer tariffs between their employer and the airline cannot claim compensation if their flight – whether for professional or private purposes – is delayed or cancelled.

Due diligence requirements regarding share ownership and related compliance in M&A transactions
Meyerlustenberger Lachenal
  • Corporate Finance/M&A
  • Switzerland
  • 16 October 2019

In Swiss M&A practice, share deals remain the most common method of acquiring a business from a third party for several reasons. Due to strict Federal Supreme Court precedents, legal due diligence regarding share ownership and related compliance has always been a fundamental component of legal due diligence in Swiss share deals. Recent legislative changes have further increased the importance of thorough due diligence in this regard.

Milan court sets precedent on second medical use invention plausibility
Hogan Lovells
  • Healthcare & Life Sciences
  • Italy
  • 16 October 2019

Few Italian precedents have considered the plausibility of a second medical use invention as a potential requirement for patent validity. However, a recent decision has clearly stated for the first time and as a matter of principle that the plausibility of an invention does not need the support of experimental data; rather, credible information based on a sound scientific and technical rationale is sufficient.

Supreme Court overturns dismissal based on employee's covert recording of conversation with employer
Norrbom Vinding
  • Employment & Benefits
  • Denmark
  • 16 October 2019

The Supreme Court recently held that an employer had been unjustified to summarily dismiss an employee with retroactive effect after discovering that he had covertly recorded a conversation with his manager. The court had to decide whether the employee's secret audio recording could be regarded as a material breach of the employment relationship and justify summary dismissal.

Thirty-month notice of termination ruling overturned
Fasken
  • Employment & Benefits
  • Canada
  • 16 October 2019

The Ontario Court of Appeal recently reaffirmed that the upper limit for reasonable notice remains 24 months, absent exceptional circumstances. This decision is a reminder of the importance of well-drafted employment contracts, particularly with regard to an employee's entitlements on termination.

Class discrimination and the workplace: TUC proposes new laws
Lewis Silkin
  • Employment & Benefits
  • United Kingdom
  • 16 October 2019

The Trades Union Congress (TUC) recently published its recommendations for eliminating class-based bias in society. Its report points to a number of statistics demonstrating that working-class individuals suffer disadvantage in the employment sphere. As such, the TUC has proposed (among other things) the introduction of compulsory class pay gap reporting for all employers.

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