Employment & Benefits updates

Malta

Contributed by Fenech & Fenech Advocates
Copyright, patents and the Trade Secrets Act – are employers now protected?
  • Malta
  • 04 December 2019

The new Trade Secrets Act entered into force in May 2019. This article examines what the new act means for employment relationships with regard to copyright, patents and trade secrets. Among other things, employers should prepare written policies to inform employees of their rights and obligations, explain what IP rights are and clarify that any creations belong to the company.

Paid apprenticeships – a step in the right direction?
  • Malta
  • 25 September 2019

The Work-Based Learning and Apprenticeship Act provides a framework for the development of effective work placements, apprenticeships and internships. It outlines responsibilities and governance structures, while defining the rights and obligations for vocational education and training providers, sponsors and learners. Despite its introduction in March 2018, few employers and students are aware of this legislation.

Employers should wait for criminal court decisions before terminating employment
  • Malta
  • 22 May 2019

Industrial Tribunal cases tend to be sensitive in nature as they essentially deal with a person's livelihood; however, when the Industrial Tribunal is faced with matters which have also been referred to the courts of criminal jurisdiction, such cases are even more complex. In particular, there are questions around how an employer should regulate itself regarding an employee's employment when it is confronted with a pending decision by the criminal court.

No warnings, no damages, no due process: one-off mistake validates employee's dismissal
  • Malta
  • 17 April 2019

The Court of Appeal recently upheld an Industrial Tribunal decision and confirmed that a company operating in the iGaming industry had been entitled to dismiss an employee who had, on one occasion, forgotten to upload games to the company's platform. Nonetheless, this is a contentious judgment which, at face value, seems to diminish the burden that an employer must prove continuous or repetitive misconduct or underperformance substantiated by valid warnings.

How reasonable is reasonable accommodation?
  • Malta
  • 20 February 2019

The Industrial Tribunal recently examined the concept of reasonable accommodation and what employers should do to accommodate their employees appropriately. In this case, the employee claimed that he had been discriminated against due to his heart condition and unfairly dismissed. The tribunal ruled in the employee's favour and awarded him €20,000 for unfair dismissal and another €10,000 for discrimination.


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