Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer LLP updates

JFTC considers application of Anti-monopoly Act to HR practices
Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer LLP
  • Competition & Antitrust
  • Japan
  • June 14 2018

In recent years, there has been a selection of work-style reforms in Japan, as well as a general move away from lifetime employment and a welcoming of more diversified ways of working, such as self-employment. In this context, the Japan Fair Trade Commission recently published its Report of Study Group on Human Resource and Competition Policy. The report covers three substantive topics: concerted practices, unilateral conducts and undesirable activities.

Sine dubio: court acknowledges pro-enforcement bias of New York Convention
Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer LLP
  • Arbitration & ADR
  • Netherlands
  • June 07 2018

The Hague Court of Appeal recently ruled that its decision on an application for the enforcement of a foreign arbitral award would not be stayed solely on the basis of pending setting aside proceedings at the place of arbitration. Further, the court ruled that the party requesting exequatur did not have to submit Dutch translations of the award. The decision is notable, as the appeal court explicitly acknowledged the New York Convention's pro-enforcement bias, which several courts have failed to do in recent years.

JFTC report on Big Data and its impact on future enforcement
Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer LLP
  • Competition & Antitrust
  • Japan
  • April 26 2018

In 2017 the Japan Fair Trade Commission Competition Policy Research Centre published a report on competition issues surrounding Big Data. While the report did not presume that an oligopoly of digitalised businesses constituted a problem, it recognised that rapid advances in machine learning and data accumulation could boost the power of existing dominant players exponentially and limit opportunities for new market entrants.

Enforcement of amended distribution guidelines – affected by EU cases?
Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer LLP
  • Competition & Antitrust
  • Japan
  • March 01 2018

Over the past two years, the Japan Fair Trade Commission (JFTC) has significantly amended its guidelines concerning distribution systems, giving particular consideration to the EU Commission's 2010 guidelines on vertical restraints. Although no cases have occurred in which the JFTC has had to decide on the legality of a particular selective distribution system, given that the number of traditional cartel cases is declining, it is likely to shift its focus to this area and follow in the footsteps of the EU Commission.

Arbitral award may be enforced after annulment at seat
Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer LLP
  • Arbitration & ADR
  • Netherlands
  • February 22 2018

The Supreme Court recently ruled that a Dutch court may enforce an annulled arbitral award if, among other things, the local annulment decision is based on grounds other than those set out in Article V(1)(a)-(d) of the New York Convention and which are not internationally recognised, or the annulment decision is irreconcilable with Dutch private international law. This judgment offers important guidance as to the Dutch courts' discretion to enforce annulled awards.

Modernising Asia's oldest competition authority
Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer LLP
  • Competition & Antitrust
  • Japan
  • January 04 2018

Over the past decade, the Japan Fair Trade Commission (JFTC) has made progressive efforts to revise its enforcement practice and procedures in order to align itself more closely with international standards. As part of its modernisation process, the JFTC is gradually adopting other regulators' assessment tools. It is also considering introducing a new penalty calculation system to provide it with more flexibility and discretion in setting fines in return for companies' cooperation.

Arbitrators' duty of disclosure
Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer LLP
  • Arbitration & ADR
  • France
  • January 04 2018

Parties' ability to choose their arbitrators remains one of the most frequently mentioned advantages of arbitration over litigation. However, this freedom makes sense only if it preserves the overarching duties of arbitrators and judges alike – that is, the duty to be and remain independent and impartial from the parties.

Will ruling denying recognition of Yukos bankruptcy affect setting aside of $50 billion UNCITRAL award?
Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer LLP
  • Arbitration & ADR
  • Netherlands
  • September 21 2017

The Amsterdam Court of Appeals recently ruled that the Russian liquidation order regarding OAO Yukos Oil Company is contrary to Dutch public order and therefore null and void. An interesting question is whether the judgment will have a bearing in the appeal of the annulment proceedings concerning the $50 billion Energy Charter Treaty arbitration case between former Yukos shareholders and Russia, which is pending before The Hague Court of Appeal.

Swatch/Tiffany setting-aside proceedings: court rules restraint must be exercised in reviewing arbitral decisions
Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer LLP
  • Arbitration & ADR
  • Netherlands
  • June 01 2017

The Amsterdam Court of Appeals recently annulled a 2013 Amsterdam District Court decision to set aside a $450 million arbitral award in proceedings between watchmaker Swatch and jeweller Tiffany. The main question for the court of appeals was whether the district court had been correct in holding that the tribunal had exceeded its authority. The judgment, which may be subjected to Supreme Court review, confirms the court's pro-arbitration and enforcement approach.

Supreme Court rules recognition of international arbitral awards not subject to appeal
Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer LLP
  • Arbitration & ADR
  • Netherlands
  • May 04 2017

In a recent decision, the Supreme Court rigorously applied Article III of the New York Convention and ruled that a decision recognising an international arbitral award is no more subject to appeal than a decision recognising a domestic arbitral award. Further, the court rejected the plea that such an appeal should be available under Article 6 of the European Convention on Human Rights.

Paris Court of Appeal rules on Iraq war's impact on due process in arbitral proceedings
Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer LLP
  • Arbitration & ADR
  • France
  • March 16 2017

The Paris Court of Appeal recently set aside an award on the grounds of a violation of the principle of equality of arms. The court had to rule on the Iraq war's impact on due process in arbitral proceedings between the Republic of Iraq and two German companies. This decision comes as a reminder that arbitration is a jurisdictional process where parties and arbitrators, while enjoying considerable freedom and flexibility, should be mindful of due process and fair trial guarantees.

Principle of procedural estoppel under French arbitration law
Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer LLP
  • Arbitration & ADR
  • France
  • November 03 2016

The French courts recently supported the rigorous application of the principle of procedural estoppel and reiterated their commitment to the enforcement of agreements that govern arbitral proceedings. The principle prevents parties from relying on alleged irregularities that affect arbitration proceedings before the French courts if the requesting party has not initially raised them before the arbitral tribunal.

Independence and impartiality: Supreme Court confirms stern approach to duty of disclosure
Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer LLP
  • Arbitration & ADR
  • France
  • April 21 2016

A recent Supreme Court decision confirms French law's strict approach in matters involving arbitrators' independence and impartiality. The court found that despite an arbitrator's previous disclosure that his firm had had an inactive relationship with the parent company of one of the parties to the arbitration, his later failure to disclose that this relationship had resumed created reasonable doubt as to his independence and impartiality.

Acknowledgement that civil courts can rule on enforcement of foreign awards involving public law matters
Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer LLP
  • Arbitration & ADR
  • France
  • December 17 2015

The jurisdictional duality which characterises the French legal system triggers practical difficulties in international arbitrations, especially when they involve the recognition and enforcement in France of arbitral awards relating to issues of French administrative law. The Cour de Cassation recently decided on this issue, holding that civil courts have jurisdiction to rule on the recognition and enforcement of any foreign arbitral award.

Diplomatic immunity from enforcement: Supreme Court shatters the shield
Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer LLP
  • Arbitration & ADR
  • France
  • August 13 2015

The issue of sovereign immunity from enforcement is highly sensitive. It is regarded as a vital component of state sovereignty and as necessary to preserve peaceful relationships between states, and should be recognised as a matter of international comity. However, the interests of international commerce and private parties cannot be denied. The Supreme Court recently issued a key decision focusing on diplomatic assets.

Dilatory challenges of awards and fraudulent arbitration proceedings in crosshairs
Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer LLP
  • Arbitration & ADR
  • France
  • April 30 2015

Two recent Paris Court of Appeal decisions offer a contrasting perspective on the challenges associated with arbitration: while the enforcement of awards that have been recognised must be facilitated and applications for stays of enforcement are held to the most stringent standards, the legitimacy of arbitration requires that the legal process remain immune from suspicions of corruption and fraud.

Challenges of arbitrators: clarification on timeframe and standard of review
Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer LLP
  • Arbitration & ADR
  • France
  • December 04 2014

In order to enhance the flexibility of the arbitral process, French arbitration law allows parties to nominate their arbitrators, either directly or by reference to arbitration rules. Two recent decisions on conflicts of interest are illustrative of the approach of French courts, which seek to strike a delicate balance between giving arbitration users added freedom and ensuring that due process and fair trial guarantees apply

Paris Court of Appeal issues three confirmations in one decision
Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer LLP
  • Arbitration & ADR
  • France
  • May 29 2014

In its April 1 2014 decision the Paris Court of Appeal has reiterated its well-established position in relation to the enforcement of arbitral awards set aside at the seat of arbitration, confirmed the arbitrators' duty of disclosure, and restated the respective roles played by the arbitrators' duty of disclosure and the parties' duty of loyalty in arbitration proceedings.

Bilateral option clause – importance of clear and unequivocal wording
Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer LLP
  • Arbitration & ADR
  • France
  • April 10 2014

The Supreme Court has upheld the validity and enforceability of a bilateral option clause which gave both parties the option to resolve their dispute by way of arbitration or through domestic courts. While this decision clarifies the French courts' position regarding bilateral option clauses, it raises concerns as to the validity of sole option clauses.

Enforcement of international arbitration awards: further developments
Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer LLP
  • Arbitration & ADR
  • France
  • October 03 2013

Reforms to French arbitration law determined that appellate review would no longer automatically stay execution of an award. A member of Parliament questioned this regime, which does not provide for an adversarial debate at the level of the application for an exequatur order, by posing a question to the minister of justice. The minister recently responded that exequatur proceedings are to remain ex parte – for now, at least.

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