KISCH IP updates

Patentability of living things – a South African approach
KISCH IP
  • Intellectual Property
  • South Africa
  • 30 September 2019

Patent protection of living organisms – and the substances derived therefrom – has long been an area of confusion and controversy in South Africa. However, there has been a recent move towards clearer boundaries regarding what constitutes patentable subject matter in relation to living things.

Who should you institute infringement proceedings against?
KISCH IP
  • Intellectual Property
  • South Africa
  • 23 September 2019

What should a company do when its distributor terminates their supply and distribution contract stating that it is more economical for it to acquire the products from another company? If the first company has a registered patent for the products that the other company is manufacturing, it can institute infringement proceedings. However, the question then becomes against whom should it institute these proceedings: the distributor or the company infringing its patent?

Who takes the cake? Copyright over baked goods
KISCH IP
  • Intellectual Property
  • South Africa
  • 16 September 2019

Professional and amateur bakers are often inspired by the extravagant and intricately designed cakes shown on TV shows. However, this begs the question of whether bakers can reproduce these cakes (or at least try to) without getting into trouble. Perhaps surprisingly, the answer is probably no, as these creations may be subject to copyright protection. Therefore, as with all copyright infringement, it is important to be cautious when taking inspiration from other people's creations.

Copyright conundrum: what you need to know when rebranding
KISCH IP
  • Intellectual Property
  • South Africa
  • 09 September 2019

Many corporates and start-ups that enlist third-party graphic designers to create logos or corporate identities during a rebrand are unaware of the legal implications of contracting third parties and thus often find themselves in costly and time-consuming litigation. This is because, under South African law, a third-party graphic designer commissioned to design a corporate's logo will own the copyright in said work. To avoid this situation, a logo must be assigned from a third-party graphic designer to the corporation or start-up immediately.

Nedbank and IT entrepreneurs in developing patent saga
KISCH IP
  • Intellectual Property
  • South Africa
  • 02 September 2019

Two IT entrepreneurs recently applied for an interdict to prevent an asset management company from using (ie, infringing) their invention. The case has raised many questions regarding the validity of certain patents, including what protections are afforded to entrepreneurs. Young entrepreneurs in particular are encouraged to follow this case earnestly to ensure that they are well acquainted with South African patent law and thus able to protect their inventions.

Interplay between company name reservations, trademark registrations and defensive registrations
KISCH IP
  • Intellectual Property
  • South Africa
  • 05 August 2019

Business owners often fail to conduct trademark availability searches before they register their company name at the Companies and Intellectual Property Commission (CIPC). The CIPC considers only identical or confusingly similar company names that are contained on the company names register (and not those that are contained on the trademarks register) to be potential blocks to registration. Therefore, company names that proceed to registration may infringe on trademark rights as set out in the Companies Act.

Domain name disputes – are they worth it?
KISCH IP
  • Intellectual Property
  • South Africa
  • 29 July 2019

In an age where business is conducted online, trademarks are commercialised through websites and social media pages and consumers want to deal with businesses online instead of face to face, a business' virtual address is of the utmost importance if it wants to drive traffic to its website and conclude commercial transactions online. So, what happens if a third party registers a domain name that incorporates an existing trademark? How can trademark owners begin to take action and enforce their rights?

Is my work original enough?
KISCH IP
  • Intellectual Property
  • South Africa
  • 22 July 2019

According to the Copyright Act, for copyright to subsist in a work, the work must be original and reduced to material form. However, if ideas and innovation are the result of the shared lived experience of the common person, how can it be determined whether a work is 'original' as defined in, for example, the Copyright Act? In order to be original, a work need not be innovative or new, but rather the result of the author's own skill, time and effort expended in creating the work.

What to do when your product is copied
KISCH IP
  • Intellectual Property
  • South Africa
  • 15 July 2019

South Africa has seen a dramatic rise in entrepreneurial activity, with many seeking to launch new products in the marketplace. However, with the success of a product comes the risk of the idea being copied and advantage being taken of the already established route to market, thereby affecting the original product's sales and brand. Therefore, any party that creates or legitimately distributes a product that they believe will be well received must take the appropriate steps to protect it.

Who can apply for a patent? Applicant versus inventor
KISCH IP
  • Intellectual Property
  • South Africa
  • 10 June 2019

A granted patent is a highly lucrative commercial tool in the hands of the patent applicant. However, inventors are not necessarily entitled to apply for a patent, especially in employment contexts. Inventors are therefore advised to consult with a patent attorney when they are uncertain whether an invention falls within the scope and course of their employment. It is further advisable to enter into negotiations with employers regarding compensation for the invention.

Patenting strategy: when to patent?
KISCH IP
  • Intellectual Property
  • South Africa
  • 03 June 2019

Patenting inventions is notoriously expensive; however, the benefits of having exclusive rights over an invention far exceed any initial patenting costs. The problem remains that a decision on whether to patent an invention must often be made long before the invention's commercial potential can be judged. As such, it is often difficult to know what to patent.

Overview of registered designs: what you need to know
KISCH IP
  • Intellectual Property
  • South Africa
  • 27 May 2019

The Designs Act (195/1993) gives the proprietor of a registered design control over it for a limited period. This control is not aimed at protecting an underlying concept, but rather at the appearance of a product embodying the design. This article discusses (among other things) proprietor rights, the difference between aesthetic and functional designs and the costs involved in registering a design.

How a 'House of Bonang' can house its intellectual property
KISCH IP
  • Intellectual Property
  • South Africa
  • 20 May 2019

Many celebrities extend their brands by venturing into various industries, such as Bonang Matheba who recently launched her own range of sparkling wine. While these endeavours can work well, they also create opportunities for individuals to infringe on the IP rights embedded in celebrities' respective ventures. As such, there are a number of IP rights that celebrities can use to maintain control over their brands and regulate how they are used by others.

How to protect new plant varieties
KISCH IP
  • Intellectual Property
  • South Africa
  • 13 May 2019

South Africa has no plant patent system, as the Patents Act states that a patent will not be granted for any variety of plant. Therefore, new plant varieties are protected exclusively under the Plant Breeders' Rights Act. However, genetically modified plants could be patentable subject matter under the Patents Act, as they are not strictly classed as new varieties of plant.

Patentability of biotechnological inventions
KISCH IP
  • Intellectual Property
  • South Africa
  • 06 May 2019

An element isolated from the human body or otherwise produced by means of a technical process, including the sequence or partial sequence of a gene, may constitute a patentable invention. However, when considering the patenting of a life sciences invention in South Africa, a number of questions should be addressed in relation to, among other things, the invention's novelty, inventiveness and usefulness.

Rights holder protection against anti-counterfeiting
KISCH IP
  • Intellectual Property
  • South Africa
  • 29 April 2019

The Counterfeit Goods Act was proclaimed to enforce and protect IP rights holders against counterfeiting. The act enables certain IP rights holders and other persons with an interest in protected goods – including licensees, importers, exporters, distributors and duly authorised attorneys and agents – to act speedily and efficiently against persons involved in counterfeiting on either a criminal or civil level.

Royalties, currency conversion and taxes: what rights holders need to know
KISCH IP
  • Intellectual Property
  • South Africa
  • 22 April 2019

South Africa has significant exchange control regulations in place that restrict and require approval for payments in international IP licensing relationships. Typically, if an IP right in issue has been commercialised or if its commercialisation is imminent, exchange control requires an appropriately motivated valuation substantiating the price to be furnished.

Patent law overview
KISCH IP
  • Intellectual Property
  • South Africa
  • 08 April 2019

A patent grants the holder an exclusive right or monopoly to exclude third parties from exploiting the patented invention for a limited period in a specific territory. This article discusses the nuances of South African law in this regard, including with regard to patentable inventions, patent longevity and the requirements for patent specifications.

Are trade secrets and know-how protected?
KISCH IP
  • Intellectual Property
  • South Africa
  • 01 April 2019

South Africa has no specific legislation governing trade secrets or know-how, although they can be effectively protected under common law. Parties will often enter into agreements when transferring trade secrets or know-how between each other for any purpose. These agreements expressly protect the use and handling of information and set out the indemnities in respect of its loss or misuse.

Overview of trademark legislation
KISCH IP
  • Intellectual Property
  • South Africa
  • 25 March 2019

Trademarks are a company's most valuable asset. Over time, they can appreciate in value and as a company's reputation grows, so too will the value of its trademarks. This article provides an overview of South Africa's trademark legislation and serves as a useful guide on, among other things, the trademark application procedure, buying and selling trademarks and company or close corporation name protection.

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