Hong Kong updates

Arbitration & ADR

ADR coming of age for financial disputes in Hong Kong
  • Hong Kong
  • November 02 2017

Hong Kong's Financial Dispute Resolution Scheme will be expanded with effect from January 1 2018 and July 1 2018 by amending the jurisdiction and terms of reference of the Financial Dispute Resolution Centre. Alongside the recent changes to allow third-party funding in arbitration, the changes to the scheme show that alternative dispute resolution is coming of age for financial disputes in Hong Kong where there is an imbalance of power between parties.


Employment & Benefits

Contributed by Howse Williams Bowers
First Conduct Rule breaches: not just anti-competitive, but illegal
  • Hong Kong
  • June 20 2018

The Competition Commission recently issued an advisory bulletin on the potential risks that could arise under the Competition Ordinance (Cap 619) in the employment context. The commission identified a number of practices between employers which are at risk of contravening the First Conduct Rule of the ordinance – specifically, wage-fixing and non-poaching agreements and the exchange of sensitive information.

With great power comes great responsibility
  • Hong Kong
  • May 30 2018

In a recent case, a senior employee was found to have acted as a de facto director of the plaintiff company as a result of her position and responsibilities within the company. Consequently, the employee was held to have breached the fiduciary duties which she owed to the company by diverting business opportunities away from it and making unauthorised use of its resources.


Insolvency & Restructuring

Key changes to winding-up and insolvency law – part two
  • Hong Kong
  • August 26 2016

The Companies (Winding Up and Miscellaneous Provisions) (Amendment) Ordinance 2016 introduces key changes to the administration of the winding-up process. While the ordinance aims to improve the corporate winding-up regime by increasing creditor protection and enhancing the integrity of the winding-up process, the somewhat limited changes represent a missed opportunity to modernise Hong Kong's antiquated corporate insolvency regime.

Key changes to winding-up and insolvency law
  • Hong Kong
  • June 24 2016

After months of consultation and debate, the Companies (Winding Up and Miscellaneous Provisions) (Amendment) Ordinance 2016 has been published, although an enforcement date is yet to be set. The stated aim is to improve and modernise the corporate winding-up regime by increasing protection of creditors and enhancing the integrity of the winding-up process.


Insurance

Contributed by Howse Williams Bowers
Lawmakers building HK$1 million safety net for policyholders
  • Hong Kong
  • May 22 2018

Lawmakers recently met to discuss a new bill to establish a policyholders' protection scheme to protect policyholders' interests in case an insurer becomes insolvent. This safety net will cover individuals, small and medium-sized enterprises and building owners' corporations. All authorised insurers in Hong Kong will have to participate and pay an initial levy to build up the two compensation funds – namely, the life fund (for long-term policies) and the non-life fund (for general policies).

Complaint channels for insurance policyholders
  • Hong Kong
  • April 03 2018

If a policyholder is dissatisfied with the conduct of an insurer, agent or broker, there are various channels for making a complaint. One such channel is the Insurance Claims Complaints Bureau, which was recently revamped to provide Hong Kong's insurance industry with improved methods of settling personal insurance claims and disputes by providing policyholders with an alternative dispute resolution process.

'Insurtech' initiatives in Hong Kong
  • Hong Kong
  • January 30 2018

The Insurance Authority has launched two new initiatives to promote the use of 'insurtech' in Hong Kong and encourage insurers and technology companies to team up to develop innovative insurance technology in light of recent market trends. The initiatives aim to promote the development of new technologies in Hong Kong's insurance sector and maintain Hong Kong's competitiveness in the Asian market.

New insurance levy to be introduced
  • Hong Kong
  • November 14 2017

The Insurance Authority will begin to collect a levy from policyholders through premium payments to insurers from January 1 2018. Holders of life insurance policies and general insurance policies (eg, travel, motor, property and household) will be required to pay the levy; however, reinsurers, policies underwritten by captive insurers and marine, aviation and goods-in-transit businesses are exempt.

Court quashes payment order made against AIA and order costs against tribunal
  • Hong Kong
  • September 05 2017

The Insurance Agents Registration Board recently initiated disciplinary proceedings against a former AIA International Limited agent for breaches of the Code of Practice issued by the Hong Kong Federation of Insurers. The resulting disciplinary action included a payment order of HK$806,200 against AIA; however, this decision was reversed by the Court of First Instance following a judicial review.


Litigation

Contributed by RPC
Top court rules on protective costs orders
  • Hong Kong
  • June 12 2018

A recent landmark judgment of the Court of Final Appeal confirms that in deciding whether it is fair and just to grant a protective costs order in public interest litigation, the courts should be apprised of an applicant's financial position. In the case of a corporate applicant, it is proper to inquire not only into the assets belonging to the company, but also other sources of funding to which it has access. The case is the first in Hong Kong in which the courts have extensively set out the relevant legal principles in this regard.

Court upholds privacy rights in face of disciplinary proceedings
  • Hong Kong
  • May 29 2018

The High Court recently dismissed proceedings seeking to compel the Hospital Authority to disclose confidential patient records in connection with professional disciplinary proceedings. The decision serves as a good reminder of the tension that exists between the competing interests of preserving client (or patient) privacy rights and the necessity and public interest in the proper administration of professional disciplinary proceedings.

Production of company documents to liquidators
  • Hong Kong
  • May 15 2018

A recent case involved a contested dispute over the liquidators' access to certain documents stated to be in the respondent's possession or control. At first instance, the court refused to order the respondent to give wide-ranging production of documents to the liquidators on the basis that the documents sought did not fall within Section 221(3) of the Companies (Winding Up and Miscellaneous Provisions) Ordinance. This judgment was recently successfully appealed by the liquidators.

Flawed claim against solicitors struck out
  • Hong Kong
  • April 24 2018

In defending themselves against a claim for professional negligence brought by a former client, two law firms and the individual solicitor recently successfully applied to strike out the entire claim against them, with costs awarded on a more generous ('indemnity') basis. The two related judgments are a salutary reminder of the need for a plaintiff to plead all material particulars, failing which there is a real prospect that their claim could be struck out as plainly defective.

Amendments that do more than 'relate back'
  • Hong Kong
  • April 10 2018

The recent judgment in Tao Soh Ngun v HSBC International Trustee Ltd arose from an interesting piece of litigation. In this case, the plaintiff appears to have tried to amend her pleading to add new allegations of breach and loss based on matters that did not exist at the time when the proceedings commenced. To have allowed such amendments would not have sat comfortably with the 'relate back' principle (ie, that an amendment takes effect from the date of the original pleading).