Latest updates

Court examines scope of multimodal transport
Arnecke Sibeth Dabelstein
  • Germany
  • 02 October 2019

Federal Court of Justice case law suggests that, in multimodal transport cases, voyages always have a series of sections and there are no stages without sections. However, a recent Hamburg Regional Court decision suggests that there may be transport stages in a multimodal transport system that cannot be attributed to a particular section.

Calculating carriers' contributory negligence
Arnecke Sibeth Dabelstein
  • Germany
  • 25 September 2019

In a decision which conflicts with the examination sequence typically preferred by the Federal Court of Justice, the Hamburg Higher Regional Court ruled that a carrier's liability had been miscalculated and that that contributory negligence should have been examined before the limitations of liability. The court opined that, in view of Section 254 of the Civil Code, contributory negligence should be considered after or in conjunction with determining concrete damages and before the limitations of liability.

Court removes need for bailiffs to board ships to execute arrests
AKD The Netherlands
  • Netherlands
  • 25 September 2019

The Netherlands has long been considered one of the most favourable jurisdictions in which to arrest a ship. A recent Aruba Court ruling is set to enhance this reputation by further liberalising the procedural rules, removing the need for a bailiff to board a ship in order to execute an arrest. The decision is expected to play a role in ship arrest cases throughout the Kingdom of the Netherlands where bad weather conditions, or even deliberate obstruction, may prevent bailiffs from boarding ships.

New maritime code offers a way forward
Franco & Abogados Asociados
  • Colombia
  • 25 September 2019

The National Maritime Authority recently published the first draft of what could become the new Colombian maritime code. The draft aims to consolidate the main regulations applicable to maritime activities at the domestic level in a single piece of legislation (ie, a maritime code). Among other things, it incorporates regulations on subjects such as navigation-related issues, contracts for vessel exploitation and court procedures for resolving traditional maritime incidents (eg, collisions).

Ministry of Infrastructure announces programme to encourage maritime cabotage
Kincaid | Mendes Vianna Advogados
  • Brazil
  • 25 September 2019

The Ministry of Infrastructure recently announced a new programme to encourage maritime cabotage. To achieve this aim, the programme will introduce measures to increase the volume of goods transported by cabotage, increase the number of cabotage vessels, increase the competitiveness of Brazilian shipping companies and develop Brazil's shipbuilding industry.

Additional place of jurisdiction clause in ADSp 2017
Arnecke Sibeth Dabelstein
  • Germany
  • 18 September 2019

The Freight Forwarders' Standard Terms and Conditions (ADSp) are general terms of service recommended by several trade associations. In a recent non-published decision, the Dresden Higher Regional Court addressed whether, in addition to the place of jurisdiction specifications in Section 30.3 of the ADSp 2017, the place of jurisdiction rules set out in Section 30(1) of the Code of Civil Procedure also apply in legal disputes against freight forwarders.

Brazil expands its maritime border
Kincaid | Mendes Vianna Advogados
  • Brazil
  • 18 September 2019

In March 2019 the UN Convention on the Law of the Sea's Commission on the Limits of the Continental Shelf partially approved Brazil's April 2015 southern margin request, which will allow Brazil to add 170,000km2 to its continental shelf in addition to its exclusive economic zone. As a result, Brazil will be able to exercise its sovereign rights for the exploitation of mineral resources and other non-living seabed resources in its expanded maritime territory.

Finance leasing: from resolution to lapse
  • France
  • 18 September 2019

A Court of Cassation decision relating to a finance lease agreement for a truck has brought longstanding jurisprudence in line with recent legislation. As such, finance lessors must ensure that indemnity provisions are ring-fenced and protected from the voiding of the finance lease agreement if the underlying sales contract disappears.

Flag injunctions: practical alternative to ship arrests
Fenech & Fenech Advocates
  • Malta
  • 11 September 2019

Maltese law is straightforward in terms of who has a right to arrest and which claims can be secured by means of an arrest. However, while ship arrests are a powerful legal remedy for creditors, they have one major limitation: they are possible only where the targeted vessel actually enters Maltese waters. As such, the legal system has introduced the Section 37 injunction, which provides creditors with an interesting, cost-efficient remedy where a ship arrest is not possible.

Tribunal of Genoa examines jurisdiction issue in pre-trial proceedings regarding court surveyor's appointment
Dardani Studio Legale
  • Italy
  • 11 September 2019

A recent Tribunal of Genoa case concerning a yacht lost during carriage examined whether the Italian courts have jurisdiction to appoint court surveyors and order survey operations to take place in Italy where the merits of a dispute are not subject to Italian jurisdiction. According to the tribunal, the fact that the merits of the dispute in question were to be decided in London did not deprive the Italian courts' jurisdiction to order inspection and survey operations on goods located in Italy.

Brexit's potential impact on shipping in Cyprus
Elias Neocleous & Co LLC
  • Cyprus
  • 21 August 2019

In an effort to minimise disruption to the shipping industry deriving from Brexit, the Shipping Deputy Ministry has undertaken a number of contingency measures. However, the ministry has emphasised that affected parties must also make their own preparations for the United Kingdom's withdrawal from the European Union and that where new authorisations, licences or certificates will be required post-Brexit, each party will be responsible for applying in good time.

Doing maritime business in Nigeria's $10 billion charter market
Akabogu & Associates
  • Nigeria
  • 21 August 2019

The general Nigerian economic landscape could be seen as challenging, but its robustness and potential make it worthwhile for parties that do their research. As the Nigerian ship charter market is estimated to be worth at least $10 billion, there is a lot of potential for interested parties to benefit.

How to prepare for new Incoterms
AKD
  • International
  • 31 July 2019

The International Chamber of Commerce is set to launch a new version of the Incoterms rules – the globally used, standardised set of trade terms for the international sale and delivery of goods. Although the new rules will not take effect until 1 January 2020, parties involved in the international sale and delivery of goods should use the impending introduction of the new rules as an opportunity to review their existing contracts and standard delivery terms and determine whether they are being used correctly.

Direct action, choice of law and time limitation
WSCO Advokatpartnerselskab
  • Denmark
  • 31 July 2019

The Maritime and Commercial High Court recently examined a direct action claim against a Dutch freight liability insurer in a carriage of goods by road dispute involving a bankrupt carrier and a Danish manufacturer of cigarettes. The premise relied on by the court in this matter, if not appealed, may seem ripe to undermine some insurance policies between liability insurers and international carriers, including proper law provisions and time limitation under a policy.

Wrongful vessel arrest in collision claim
Shearn Delamore & Co
  • Malaysia
  • 31 July 2019

In a recent case, a plaintiff claimed that the defendant's vessel had collided into its vessel. To stop the plaintiff from arresting the vessel, the defendant obtained a letter of undertaking from the London Protection and Indemnity Club. However, notwithstanding the issue of the first letter of undertaking, the plaintiff arrested the vessel. The defendant subsequently asked the court to, among other things, declare the first letter of undertaking binding on the parties and set aside the warrant of arrest.

Suppression of Piracy and Other Maritime Offences Act 2019: a review
Akabogu & Associates
  • Nigeria
  • 31 July 2019

The president recently assented to the Suppression of Piracy and Other Maritime Offences Bill, successfully concluding almost a decade of advocacy to implement such a law in order to curb and deter sea piracy, armed robbery and other unlawful acts at sea. The new law has ended the controversy around whether the crime of sea piracy is defined in any local legislation and bestowed on the Federal High Court exclusive jurisdiction to determine matters of armed robbery and other unlawful acts at sea.

The bunker balance – owners consider liquefied natural gas in advance of 2020
Wikborg Rein
  • International
  • 17 July 2019

Using liquefied natural gas (LNG) rather than fuel oil is one of a range of options available to owners seeking to comply with the International Maritime Organisation's 2020 regulations. Given that shipbrokers have long predicted the emergence of a two-tier shipping market with 'greener' ships commanding a premium over older, less eco-friendly vessels, what is the future for LNG bunkering and what challenges does it present?

Appellate court rules that subrogated insurers assume same rights and limitations as assureds
Kincaid | Mendes Vianna Advogados
  • Brazil
  • 17 July 2019

A recent Sao Paulo State Appellate Court case concerned a carriage of goods by sea from Port Everglades (United States) to the port of Rio de Janeiro (Brazil). The court's decision sets an important precedent in recognising that subrogation cannot be used to reinstate a right that no longer applies where a rights holder fails to observe a legal requirement. Therefore, subrogated insurers assume the same rights and limitations as assureds.

Readiness for global sulphur cap – BIMCO's new IMO 2020 clauses
Wikborg Rein
  • International
  • 10 July 2019

Most parties involved in the shipping industry will by now have a clear picture of the requirements under the International Maritime Organisation (IMO) 2020 global sulphur cap on marine fuels. Therefore, attention has turned to the steps that must be taken to put these requirements into practice. Two clauses recently introduced by the Baltic and International Maritime Council aim to address certain contractual aspects of the IMO requirements as they apply to time charterparties.

Carrier liability for loss of goods and delayed delivery
Arnecke Sibeth Dabelstein
  • Germany
  • 10 July 2019

The distinction between freight and forwarding contracts is a common subject of legal disputes in Germany, as freight forwarders are generally liable only for organisational or selection faults and can usually relieve themselves of liability if they can prove that they chose a conscientious carrier. A recent Verden Regional Court ruling on the liability of a carrier for loss of goods and delayed delivery provides useful clarity in this context.