Latest updates

Canada's Air Passenger Protection Regulations coming into force
Bersenas Jacobsen Chouest Thomson Blackburn LLP
  • Canada
  • 19 June 2019

Following several rounds and many months of consultations, the government recently announced that the Air Passenger Protection Regulations (APPRs) developed by the Canadian Transportation Agency have been finalised. The APPRs apply to all flights within, from or to Canada, whether operated by a Canadian or foreign airline. Once in effect, the regulations will impose obligations on carriers in cases of tarmac delays, denied boarding and delayed and cancelled flights.

Civil aviation security: new regulations take effect
SKRINE
  • Malaysia
  • 19 June 2019

The Civil Aviation (Security) Regulations 2019 (Security Regulations) recently entered into force. Among other things, the regulations have established new aviation security authorities, implemented national security programmes and introduced new security and screening controls. Passengers, operators (including aerodrome operators), ground handlers and other persons who fail to comply with the Security Regulations could face a fine of up to RM200,000 or up to five years' imprisonment (or both).

Government reopens negotiations on overflight fees and airspace management
Callenders & Co
  • Bahamas
  • 19 June 2019

The Bahamas' flight information region airspace comprises tens of thousands of miles and is subject to significant overflight activity. Moreover, it is one of the most important airspaces and is worth millions in revenue. To further enhance the civil aviation sector, the government is seeking to create a self-funded and sustainable management programme in order to collect overflight fees, while paying the US Federal Aviation Administration a fee for the management of its airspace.

Aircraft repossession: judiciary fails to uphold local law or Cape Town Convention
Basch & Rameh
  • Brazil
  • 12 June 2019

Following developments earlier in 2019, aircraft repossession has continued to be in the spotlight – yet again with regard to the Oceanair Linhas Aéreas SA (commonly known as 'Avianca Brazil') bankruptcy and, in particular, the experience of lessors that sought repossession of leased aircraft therefrom. In this case, and contrary to Avianca Brazil's pre-bankruptcy experience, a bankruptcy court failed to uphold the express provisions of the Bankruptcy Law 2005 and the Cape Town Convention

Proposed class action takes aim at airport fees paid by airline employees
Bersenas Jacobsen Chouest Thomson Blackburn LLP
  • Canada
  • 05 June 2019

Three dozen Canadian airports may be on the hook for fees charged to airline employees flying on employee travel passes. A proposed class action has been commenced in the Federal Court of Canada claiming compensation for airline employees who paid certain fees which the representative plaintiff claims should not have been paid pursuant to agreements signed by the defendant airports.

Courts underline passengers' duty to arrive at departure gate on time
Levitan, Sharon & Co
  • Israel
  • 29 May 2019

Under the Aviation Services Law (Compensation and Assistance for Flight Cancellation or Change of Conditions), passengers who are denied boarding are entitled to compensation. However, in two recent district court judgments concerning passengers that were denied boarding, the courts found that passengers must arrive at the boarding gate on time. As this duty had not been fulfilled in either case, the airlines were not obliged to pay compensation.

Droniq: DFS and Deutsche Telekom enter drone business
Arnecke Sibeth Dabelstein
  • Germany
  • 29 May 2019

Commercial drone flights are expected to be a future market worth billions. Considering this prospect, the German air traffic control company Deutsche Flugsicherung and the largest telecoms provider in Europe, Deutsche Telekom, have established a joint venture, Droniq, to operate remote-controlled long-haul flights. Among other things, Droniq aims to establish a digital platform for all unmanned aerial operations and engage with security authorities and logistics companies seeking to deliver goods faster.

Opening of new Berlin Brandenburg International Airport at stake (again)
Arnecke Sibeth Dabelstein
  • Germany
  • 22 May 2019

Recent reports suggest that the need to remedy defects in a faulty fire prevention system and other construction faults will further delay the opening of the new Berlin Brandenburg International Airport. For example, an internal report by TÜV Rheinland detailed 11,519 deficiencies in the airport's emergency lighting and safety power supply cables, which were replaced after the failed opening in 2012.

Get off my plane! Court rejects damages claim by disruptive passengers
Freidenberg Freidenberg & Lifsic
  • Argentina
  • 22 May 2019

The Federal Court recently heard a case in which two passengers claimed damages from Aeromexico after they had been ordered to disembark an aircraft for being disruptive. The case provides an insight into the question of whether consumer protection law trumps flight security concerns.

Quebec court rules 'one passenger one ticket' policy applies in class action
Bersenas Jacobsen Chouest Thomson Blackburn LLP
  • Canada
  • 15 May 2019

The Quebec Superior Court of Justice recently ruled against Air Canada in a class action brought by passengers with disabilities, their attendants and obese passengers who had been required to pay for additional seats on flights. This decision confirms that carriers that do not abide by a 'one passenger one ticket' policy may be liable for discriminating against passengers with disabilities and obese passengers who require more than one seat.

Air traffic controller convictions draw criticism
Proton Legal LLC
  • Switzerland
  • 15 May 2019

Air traffic controller and pilot organisations have criticised recent convictions handed down in Switzerland for operational incidents that resulted in neither injury nor damage. Critics have asserted that criminal prosecutions in the aviation sector tend to do more harm than good. Further, there is widespread concern that criminalisation leads to a loss of cooperation from individuals who could provide the most critical insight into the circumstances of an incident.

Providing valid travel documents considered passengers' secondary obligation
Arnecke Sibeth Dabelstein
  • Germany
  • 08 May 2019

A 2018 Federal Court of Justice decision clarified that the secondary obligations arising from a contract of carriage between a passenger and an air carrier extend to the verification of the validity of the documents required for entry. However, checking that passengers have the correct documentation also remains an obligation for air carriers. Air carriers must therefore check the validity of passengers' documents before admitting them to a flight in order to rule out their own contributory negligence.

Reflections on Boeing's exposure following 737 MAX crashes
Cozen O'Connor
  • USA
  • 08 May 2019

A software issue is suggested to have played a role in the two horrific crashes involving the new Boeing 737 MAX. With this in mind, what potential theories of civil liability could Boeing be subject to by passengers and airlines that have suffered significant losses as a result of what appears to be a design flaw in this software? Further, what theories allow for criminal liability?

Manufacturers' liability in wake of AirAsia crash
Odi-se Avocats
  • France
  • 01 May 2019

The Court of Cassation recently rendered a decision concerning an AirAsia Airbus A320 which crashed in the Java Sea in December 2014, killing all crew and passengers on board. Notably, this decision reaffirms that, under French law, a manufacturer's liability cannot be limited or excluded on the grounds that another party or some other cause contributed to the damage if the product was defective and caused the damage.

Application of international air law treaties in the Maldives
Mazlan & Murad Law Associates
  • Maldives
  • 03 April 2019

The Constitution provides that any international treaty to which the Maldives becomes a party will be enforced only on Parliament's approval and in accordance with any conditions of such approval. Among others, the Maldives has ratified the Convention on International Civil Aviation and the Convention on the International Recognition of Rights in Aircraft. Further, there have been talks about implementing legislation to govern the rights of domestic air passengers.

Superior Court rules on entitlement to lost luggage compensation
Bersenas Jacobsen Chouest Thomson Blackburn LLP
  • Canada
  • 03 April 2019

The Ontario Superior Court of Justice recently ruled that in order to claim damages for lost luggage under the Montreal Convention, a passenger need not have personally checked the luggage. This decision partially affirms a decision of the province's Small Claims Court, in which the deputy judge held that, despite only one passenger in a group having checked in all of the bags, each passenger had been entitled to claim damages for lost luggage.

DOT denies petitions to initiate consumer protection rulemakings
Cozen O'Connor
  • USA
  • 03 April 2019

The Department of Transportation (DOT) recently denied three petitions to initiate rulemakings on various consumer protection issues proposed by FlyersRights, a consumer advocacy group. The DOT's decision to refuse to propose new regulations is consistent with the Trump administration's efforts to reduce regulatory burdens on industry. Nonetheless, the DOT appeared to be sympathetic to consumer protection concerns raised by FlyersRights.

Great strides made towards enhancing aircraft registry and ratifying Cape Town Convention
Callenders & Co
  • Bahamas
  • 27 March 2019

The Bahamian government continues to make progress towards enhancing its aircraft registry and ratifying the Cape Town Convention. For example, the Aviation Steering Committee (ASC) recently presented draft legislation to implement the Cape Town Convention to the Attorney General's Office. The ASC expects this draft legislation to be approved and presented to the Cabinet before the next government budget communication in Summer 2019.

GATS impact on sale and purchase of German-registered aircraft under lease
Arnecke Sibeth Dabelstein
  • Germany
  • 27 March 2019

In May 2018 the Aviation Working Group announced plans for a global aircraft trading system (GATS) to modernise the selling, buying and financing of leased aircraft and engines by making such transactions simpler and faster. The GATS will be fully electronic and use e-signatures, e-delivery of documents and a secure e-ledger to record transactions. As such, it is expected to reduce the time and costs required to change German aircraft registrations through the national aviation authority.

Did you pack your own bag? Appeal court overturns lost luggage claim
Freidenberg Freidenberg & Lifsic
  • Argentina
  • 20 March 2019

The Civil and Commercial Court of Appeals recently overturned a first-instance decision concerning a laptop lost on an Aeromexico flight from New York to Buenos Aires. The first-instance court had ordered Aeromexico to pay damages, but the appeal court found that the model of the lost laptop had never been sold in Argentina and that the plaintiff had neither proved that her laptop had been packed in her luggage nor made her claim in a timely manner.

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