Latest updates

Prior user rights under recently amended Patent Act
Smart & Biggar/Fetherstonhaugh
  • Canada
  • 17 June 2019

The Budget Implementation Act 2 has brought about several changes to the Patent Act that affect the scope of protection available under Canadian patents, including a revision of Section 56, which concerns the rights of prior users of patented technologies. However, as many of the Section 56 amendments will require judicial interpretation, the true scope of prior user rights under the revised provision may be unknown for some time.

Exception in determining functional features in patent infringement disputes
Wanhuida Peksung IP Group
  • China
  • 17 June 2019

In patent infringement disputes, it is possible to narrowly construe a feature to the specific embodiment and its equivalent embodiment by arguing that a claimed feature is a functional one. The accused infringer usually adopts this strategy in its non-infringement defence to narrowly construe the scope of patent protection to obtain a favourable position in the infringement comparison. A recent case serves as a reference on how to determine the functional features in patent infringement disputes.

Registering Chinese translations or transliterations of foreign trademarks
Lee and Li Attorneys at Law
  • Taiwan
  • 17 June 2019

As Chinese (Mandarin) is Taiwan's national language, many foreign companies use Chinese translations or transliterations of their foreign brands (trademarks) in order to expand into the Taiwanese market. However, as Chinese characters can have different pronunciations and meanings, there are often multiple ways of translating or transliterating foreign trademarks into Chinese. The Intellectual Property Court recently addressed this issue in an administrative case relating to a trademark opposition.

Top 10 changes to Canada's trademark law
Smart & Biggar/Fetherstonhaugh
  • Canada
  • 17 June 2019

After five years of anticipation, sweeping changes to Canada's trademark law have finally come into force. Among other things, Canadian applicants can now file applications in more than 80 countries around the world through a single international application and declarations of use are no longer required to secure registrations.

Procedural decisions under PMNOC Regulations: common validity issues and naming of defendants
Smart & Biggar/Fetherstonhaugh
  • Canada
  • 10 June 2019

In two recent cases, the Federal Court considered procedural decisions in actions under the Patented Medicines (Notice of Compliance) Regulations. In one case, the court ordered that common validity issues in actions relating to Bayer's Xarelto against Apotex and Teva will be heard concurrently. In another case, the court refused to allow the plaintiffs to name additional Teva parties as further defendants in three actions relating to Celltrion's Herzuma, a trastuzumab biosimilar of Roche's Herceptin.

Who can apply for a patent? Applicant versus inventor
KISCH IP
  • South Africa
  • 10 June 2019

A granted patent is a highly lucrative commercial tool in the hands of the patent applicant. However, inventors are not necessarily entitled to apply for a patent, especially in employment contexts. Inventors are therefore advised to consult with a patent attorney when they are uncertain whether an invention falls within the scope and course of their employment. It is further advisable to enter into negotiations with employers regarding compensation for the invention.

Nice Classification with a trap – Canada introduces class top-up fees with no back door
Smart & Biggar/Fetherstonhaugh
  • Canada
  • 10 June 2019

With the long-awaited changes to the Trademarks Act and Regulations imminent, brand owners should be excited about Canada's alignment with international trademark standards and the new opportunities that these changes will bring. However, brand owners should be aware that Canada has adopted a unique policy concerning the required filing fees which differs significantly from the general practice of other member countries.

Darlie toothpaste versus Darlie insect repellent: trademark squatting and bad-faith registration
Wanhuida Peksung IP Group
  • China
  • 10 June 2019

No one wants to associate toothpaste with insect repellent, but this can happen if the same names and images have been trademarked in different classes of goods. This was the situation in which Hawley & Hazel (H&H) found itself with regard to its toothpaste brand Darlie. After Guangzhou Heiren filed the same iconic image associated with Darlie and the trademark DARLIE in several classes, H&H initiated copyright infringement and bad-faith registration claims.

Change to IMPI's letters patent practice
Becerril, Coca & Becerril SC
  • Mexico
  • 03 June 2019

In 2018 the rules for notifying the issuance of a patent, utility model or industrial design application were amended. Thus, all notices issued by the Mexican Institute of Industrial Property (IMPI) must be published via the Official Gazette. In a broad interpretation of this reform, the IMPI now provides only digital copies of letters patent and utility model and industrial design registrations. While this interpretation may be inaccurate, it aligns with the global trend of digitalisation among IP offices.

Patenting strategy: when to patent?
KISCH IP
  • South Africa
  • 03 June 2019

Patenting inventions is notoriously expensive; however, the benefits of having exclusive rights over an invention far exceed any initial patenting costs. The problem remains that a decision on whether to patent an invention must often be made long before the invention's commercial potential can be judged. As such, it is often difficult to know what to patent.

Trade secrets: second amendment to Anti-unfair Competition Law
Wanhuida Peksung IP Group
  • China
  • 03 June 2019

The revision of the Anti-unfair Competition Law is part of the new effort to enhance the protection of intellectual property in China. It also reflects the ongoing negotiations between China and the United States on various topics, including IP protection. The revisions provide (among other things) a wider definition of a 'trade secret' and introduce the concept of punitive damages and the inversion of the burden of proof.

Overview of registered designs: what you need to know
KISCH IP
  • South Africa
  • 27 May 2019

The Designs Act (195/1993) gives the proprietor of a registered design control over it for a limited period. This control is not aimed at protecting an underlying concept, but rather at the appearance of a product embodying the design. This article discusses (among other things) proprietor rights, the difference between aesthetic and functional designs and the costs involved in registering a design.

Proposed amendments to Patents Ordinance
Vellani & Vellani
  • Pakistan
  • 27 May 2019

In order to integrate and upgrade Pakistan's IP infrastructure and improve its services, public awareness and IP enforcement, the Intellectual Property Office recently proposed draft amendments to the Patents Ordinance. The proposed amendments, which aim to align the ordinance with the Intellectual Property Organisation of Pakistan Act, standardise office practices and streamline procedures, have been published on the office's website for public comment but have yet to be finalised.

Filing fee for certificates of supplementary protection now increased
Smart & Biggar/Fetherstonhaugh
  • Canada
  • 27 May 2019

In accordance with Section 9(1) of the Certificate of Supplementary Protection (CSP) Regulations, the fee for filing a CSP recently increased. This article sets out a number of important reminders relating to CSPs and annual maintenance fees.

New oncology initiative and Health Canada study on biosimilar drugs
Smart & Biggar/Fetherstonhaugh
  • Canada
  • 27 May 2019

The new pan-Canadian Oncology Biosimilars Initiative aims to ensure appropriate implementation and cost-effective use of therapeutic oncology biosimilars. Separately, Health Canada recently announced that it is collaborating with the Drug Safety and Effectiveness Network on a project to study patients with certain diseases who are taking biologic drugs. The study aims to compare the safety and effectiveness of biosimilar drugs to the reference biologic drug.

Watch out! Patent and Market Court of Appeal finds watch protected by copyright
Westerberg & Partners Advokatbyrå Ab
  • Sweden
  • 27 May 2019

For the first time, the Patent and Market Court of Appeal has confirmed that a watch can be protected by copyright as a work of applied art, even in a crowded design field. The decision enables rights holders to not only pursue counterfeits on the basis of trademark infringement, but also to prosecute copycat watch models on the basis of copyright protection in physical and digital environments.

Trademark Law revised to combat squatters and counterfeiters
Wanhuida Peksung IP Group
  • China
  • 27 May 2019

In 2018 the China Trademark Office launched a consultation for the fourth revision of the Trademark Law, which will enter into force in November 2019. The revision focuses on two important issues: the proliferation of trademarks, which was one of the main issues on which comments were submitted, and enforcement actions against infringers, which are considered insufficiently deterrent. As the new law was promulgated in such a hurry, further explanation and information on how it will be implemented is necessary.

Applicants beware! IMPI's new notification procedure is a trap
Becerril, Coca & Becerril SC
  • Mexico
  • 27 May 2019

The 2018 changes to the Mexican patent system are not looking promising for patent prosecution. By way of the amendments, the Mexican Institute of Industrial Property has implemented a new system whereby it will issue official communications to applicants through its Official Gazette instead of personally or by certified mail. Applicants should exercise extreme caution in order to avoid a loss of rights due to a failure to monitor and identify issued office actions.

Red Bull doesn't always give you wings: trademark applicant defeated by energy drink giant
Danubia Patent and Law Office LLC
  • Hungary
  • 27 May 2019

An applicant filed to register the combination word mark R.E.D. RÓNA ENERGY DRINK, which was opposed by the owner of the RED BULL mark. The applicant argued that there was no likelihood of confusion, as the term 'Róna' (ie, plain) was the distinctive element of the applied-for mark. However, the Metropolitan Tribunal disagreed, finding that the central element of the applied-for mark was the acronym 'R.E.D.'.

Amendments to Patented Medicines Regulations expected to come into force no earlier than Spring 2020
Smart & Biggar/Fetherstonhaugh
  • Canada
  • 20 May 2019

Health Canada recently released its Forward Regulatory Plan 2019-2021: Regulations Amending the Patented Medicines Regulations. This brief document provides a high-level overview of the anticipated amendments released in draft form on 2 December 2017, the expected impact of these amendments and the consultation process.

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