Latest updates

Claridge's, candles and cautionary tales
Taylor Wessing
  • United Kingdom
  • 07 October 2019

The name Claridge's brings to mind one of the most luxurious hotels in London rather than court rooms and trademark law. Trading since 1856, the hotel is unlikely to have foreseen its recent dispute with a company which has sold candles and reed diffusers under the name Claridge since 2018. The case serves as a stark reminder that trademark searches must be completed prior to launching a new brand or product name.

UKIPO considers whether LINKEDIN is similar to KINKEDIN
Taylor Wessing
  • United Kingdom
  • 05 August 2019

The UK Intellectual Property Office recently upheld LinkedIn Ireland Unlimited Company's opposition to JK Solutions' registration of the word mark KINKEDIN in Class 45 designating, among other things, internet and video dating services. Despite the high degree of aural and visual similarity between LINKEDIN and KINKEDIN, the examiner held that there was no likelihood of confusion on the basis of conceptual dissimilarity alone.

UKIPO considers distinctiveness of OKAYEST for consumer products
Taylor Wessing
  • United Kingdom
  • 25 March 2019

In 2016 McMug Ltd successfully filed a UK trademark application for the mark OKAYEST for a number of products, including beer mugs, chinaware and flasks. However, AMC Photographics Limited challenged the mark's validity on the grounds that, among other things, it was devoid of distinctive character and was a wholly descriptive dictionary word (a superlative of okay). This case is a useful reminder that, even after registration, a mark can be challenged on the grounds of non-distinctiveness and descriptiveness.

UKIPO considers dispute between football clubs
Taylor Wessing
  • United Kingdom
  • 28 January 2019

Leicester City Football Club Limited recently opposed Leeds City Football Club Limited's application for a graphical trademark covering various goods and services in Classes 16, 25, 26 and 41. Leicester City's claims relied on its earlier mark for the acronym 'LCFC'. In comparing the goods and services covered by the two trademarks, the UK Intellectual Property Office held the parties' goods to be identical and their services to be identical or at least highly similar.

UKBAY v eBay – opposition based on eBay's earlier rights
Taylor Wessing
  • United Kingdom
  • 21 January 2019

A UK Intellectual Property Office (UKIPO) opposition was recently brought by eBay Inc against an application by the games company SC Zumedia Games SRL to register a figurative trademark. eBay relied on two earlier registered UK word marks for EBAY in Classes 35, 38 and 41 and figurative EU trademarks in various classes. While the UKIPO accepted that eBay has a protectable goodwill, it was satisfied that there was no likelihood that a substantial number of eBay's customers would be misrepresented.

Trademark dispute over Life Wear for clothing
Taylor Wessing
  • United Kingdom
  • 14 January 2019

In 2017 an application was filed to register LIFEWEAR CLOTHING as a UK trademark for clothing and headgear. The application was opposed by Fast Retailing Co, Ltd, the owner of the well-known UNIQLO brand, based on their trademark registrations and the reputation of UNIQLO LifeWear, as well as their unregistered rights in the term 'life wear' for clothing. UNIQLO's earlier rights covered identical goods to those applied for, making it easier to argue a likelihood of confusion (or association) between the marks.

Use it or lose it (and make sure you prove it)
Taylor Wessing
  • United Kingdom
  • 07 January 2019

Under Section 46 of the Trademarks Act 1994, a registered trademark can be removed from the register if there has been no genuine use of that mark for five years or more. This is the crux of the so-called 'use it or lose it' argument. But how much evidence is needed to prove genuine use? This question was put to the UK Intellectual Property Office during a recent revocation application.

Supreme Court rules on pregabalin patent
Taylor Wessing
  • United Kingdom
  • 03 December 2018

The Supreme Court recently handed down its judgment in the Warner-Lambert v Generics (UK) (Mylan) case concerning the validity and infringement of a patent claiming the use of pregabalin for treating neuropathic pain. The key issues which the court had to resolve were the tests for infringement of a second medical use claim and the test for plausibility of a claim such that it is sufficient.

Supreme Court says trademark owners should bear costs of implementing blocking injunctions
Taylor Wessing
  • United Kingdom
  • 13 August 2018

The Supreme Court has ruled that trademark owners should indemnify internet service providers (ISPs) for the costs incurred in blocking access to websites that infringe their marks. The decision reverses the lower courts' rulings that these costs should be picked up by ISPs. However, the indemnity must be limited to reasonable compliance costs. Therefore, the ruling should not deter brand owners from applying for blocking orders in appropriate cases.

Bolar and the experimental use exemptions in the United Kingdom
Taylor Wessing
  • United Kingdom
  • 25 June 2018

The exemptions to patent infringement applicable in the United Kingdom to life sciences products are often a source of confusion. This is not least because of the introduction of a third exemption in this area on 1 October 2014. The extent of protection offered by each exemption differs, but to some extent overlaps, and there is only slim guidance from the courts on two of the three.

Trademark hearing officer's decision vaporised by High Court
Taylor Wessing
  • United Kingdom
  • 21 May 2018

The High Court has overturned a decision of the registrar of trademarks in which an opposition against an application for a stylised mark featuring the words 'VAPE & CO' was upheld. The opposition was filed by London Vape Company Ltd based on its stylised UK registration featuring the words 'THE vape.co'. The High Court upheld the appeal, noting that "if the only similarity between the respective marks is a common element which has low distinctiveness, that points against there being a likelihood of confusion".

House of Fraser held to account by Jack Wills
  • United Kingdom
  • 27 June 2016

In the final chapter of the successful trademark infringement proceedings brought by Jack Wills Ltd against House of Fraser (Stores) Ltd, the High Court assessed the profits that the defendant retailer had to pay Jack Wills. The decision provides a useful explanation of the factors to be considered when undertaking an account of profits.

Comic Enterprises remains gleeful as Court of Appeal upholds series marks
  • United Kingdom
  • 13 June 2016

The Court of Appeal recently ruled on an outstanding aspect of the 'Glee' trademark dispute and confirmed the compatibility of Section 41 of the Trademark Act – concerning the registration of series marks – with EU law. Provided that series marks are sufficiently similar to meet the qualifying conditions set out in Section 41, they are individually entitled to the protection afforded to every trademark under EU law.

Supreme Court sends Trunki packing for good
  • United Kingdom
  • 04 April 2016

In the latest instalment of the ongoing saga involving the 'Trunki' suitcase, the Supreme Court has unanimously dismissed the appeal filed by Magmatic. This means that the Court of Appeal judgment stands, which held that PMS's 'Kiddee Case' did not infringe the registered design rights in Magmatic's Trunki case because the "overall impression" of the two products was sufficiently different.

Comic Enterprises feeling gleeful after Court of Appeal upholds trademark infringement
  • United Kingdom
  • 14 March 2016

In the latest instalment of the trademark dispute between Comic Enterprises and Twentieth Century Fox, the Court of Appeal upheld the 2014 High Court decision that use of the sign 'Glee' by Twentieth Century Fox in respect of its well-known television programme infringed a series of registered trademarks owned by Comic Enterprises Ltd, which runs a collection of comedy clubs named 'Glee' across the United Kingdom.

Stuck in the middle with (Section) 52
  • United Kingdom
  • 08 February 2016

Section 52 of the Copyright Designs and Patent Act 1988 limits the duration of copyright in artistic works that have been industrially exploited with the copyright owner's consent to 25 years (ie, the same maximum protection available for designs). The government intends to revoke Section 52 in light of concerns raised by designers; but following further objections from businesses, controversial new repeal proposals have been drafted.

The future of shape marks
  • United Kingdom
  • 16 November 2015

The European Court of Justice recently handed down its preliminary ruling on the registration and validity of shape marks following a referral from the High Court in the well-publicised case between Nestlé and Cadbury. The case, which began as a contested trademark application in 2010, concerned the Kit Kat chocolate bar, the shape of which Nestlé wished to register in Class 30.

IP Crime Report reveals scale of infringements
  • United Kingdom
  • 26 October 2015

According to the IP Crime Report 2014/2015, published by the national IP Crime Group, the Border Force detained more than 1.6 million infringing items over the reporting year, with an 'if genuine' retail value in excess of £56 million. The report also notes that a key emerging trend is the threat from social media. The Anti-counterfeiting Group and its partners are responding to this threat with several significant initiatives.

Asos 'supreme' – but what will a change in the law mean?
  • United Kingdom
  • 31 August 2015

​Following the Court of Appeal decision in the Assos v Asos trademark dispute, there have been two interesting developments which affect it. First, the Supreme Court has refused permission to appeal the Court of Appeal decision; second, the European Commission has set out plans to change the law so that the 'own name' defence will no longer apply to corporations.

Private copying exception deemed unlawful
  • United Kingdom
  • 03 August 2015

The High Court has found that the introduction of the exception for private copying of copyright-protected works without a compensation scheme was unlawful. However, the court did not strike out the exception, instead granting the secretary of state three options to rectify the error. Whatever happens next, it is clear that change is required.