Latest updates

Time waits for know-ledge: but what does that mean for limitation?
RPC
  • United Kingdom
  • 12 February 2019

Section 14A of the Limitation Act sets out the position on latent damage in negligence claims. Litigation around the application of Section 14A has predominantly centred on when the claimant has the requisite knowledge to bring a claim and if a claim could, and should, have been brought earlier. This has been brought into sharp focus in a recent case relating to a claim brought against the Bank of Scotland.

Interest rate swap derivative contract – Milan Court of Appeals confirms first-instance decision
Ichino Brugnatelli e Associati Studio Legale
  • Italy
  • 12 February 2019

The Milan Court of Appeals recently rejected an appeal against a Milan Court of First Instance judgment concerning an interest rate swap derivative contract. The complainant had asked the first-instance court for a statement of nullity regarding the contract, claiming that its purpose could not be determined and that no adequate risk exposure information had been provided. However, the first-instance court confirmed existing case law and excluded any reason for nullity of the contract.

Beirut Supreme Court confirms that trademark ownership is acquired through use, not registration
Farran Law Firm
  • Lebanon
  • 12 February 2019

In a drawn-out dispute between the Kataeb Political Party and The Modern Media Company (MMC), the Beirut Supreme Court has confirmed that ownership of a trademark or trade name is acquired through use and not through registration with the relevant authorities. However, the MMC believes that the court made a serious error in its decision and has thus appealed to the country's highest court.

Something fishy about request for judicial assistance
RPC
  • Hong Kong
  • 12 February 2019

A recent judgment concerning a rather bold request for judicial assistance by the Chapter 11 trustee of a company within the China Fisheries Group provides a useful reminder of the common law criteria to be applied for recognition of foreign office holders. However, a more interesting point, perhaps, is that the Hong Kong courts will not be afraid to defend the integrity of their orders if and when attempts are made to circumvent them.

Court of Appeal overturns anti-suit injunction in favour of Argyle Funds SPC Inc
  • Cayman Islands
  • 05 February 2019

The Court of Appeal has unanimously allowed every ground of an appeal by the liquidators of Argyle Funds SPC Inc. The key takeaway for the Cayman Islands professional services industry is that where work is delegated to be carried out by related entities outside the Cayman Islands, any attempt to contractually limit clients' rights to bring claims against those entities must be expressly articulated within the contract.

Drafting a contract? Beware the well-intentioned but unenforceable agreement to agree
RPC
  • United Kingdom
  • 05 February 2019

A recent Court of Appeal decision examined a dispute concerning entitlements under an earn-out provision in a share purchase agreement. The claimant argued that, under the agreement, he was entitled to provide consultancy services for a further period to be agreed by the parties. However, the court found that there is no obligation on parties to negotiate in good faith about matters which remain to be agreed and that the defendant was free to negotiate in accordance with its own commercial interests.

Federal Court will not condone irregularities in court orders
Gan Partnership
  • Malaysia
  • 29 January 2019

The Federal Court recently reaffirmed that where a final court order is proved to be null and void on grounds of illegality or due to a lack of jurisdiction, the court has inherent jurisdiction to set aside the order, even in the absence of an express enabling provision. However, is the rule different for winding-up orders?

When cyber fraud strikes: delineating coverage if employees are duped
Dentons
  • Canada
  • 29 January 2019

The recent growth and sophistication of modern fraud and cybersecurity attacks have necessitated adaptable countermeasures by for-profit and non-profit organisations. Of these countermeasures, the emergence of niche cybercrime and fraud insurance (eg, cyber liability insurance) has given credence to the ethos that cybersecurity breaches are not a matter of if but when. A recent case considered the limits of a funds transfer fraud policy and highlights the importance of reading insurance policies carefully.

Football club loses return fixture as entire agreement clause lets in misrepresentation claim
RPC
  • United Kingdom
  • 29 January 2019

The High Court recently confirmed on appeal from a master's decision that although an entire agreement clause concerning the sale of Nottingham Forest Football Club purported to extinguish all previous representations, it did not in fact exclude liability for misrepresentation. That there were contractual indemnities covering effectively the same subject matter did not, without clear language, mean that liability had been excluded.

Court dismisses defendants' application in limitation period case
Elias Neocleous & Co LLC
  • Cyprus
  • 29 January 2019

Limitation periods in Cyprus were suspended for many years. However, in 2012 the Limitation of Actionable Rights Law was enacted to reintroduce time limits for the filing of civil claims. In a recent case, the District Court of Limassol held that the law on limitation periods, together with Article 30.2 of the Constitution, imposes specific time limits to ensure the rule of finality and distinguish between bona fide and mala fide civil and criminal procedures.

Update on reciprocal enforcement of mainland and Hong Kong civil judgments
RPC
  • Hong Kong
  • 29 January 2019

The Arrangement on Reciprocal Recognition and Enforcement of Judgments in Civil and Commercial Matters by the Courts of the Mainland and of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (HKSAR) was recently signed by the Supreme People's Court and the HKSAR government. This is the sixth arrangement with the mainland on mutual legal assistance in civil and commercial matters and the third arrangement providing for recognition and enforcement of judgments in civil and commercial matters.

Can expert evidence be used to determine dishonesty?
RPC
  • United Kingdom
  • 22 January 2019

A recent High Court of Justice case reinforced the courts' desire to remain the guardians of honest behaviour in relation to financial market practices; the objective standards of dishonesty are to be set by the courts rather than the market. Parties must therefore rely on contemporaneous documents when trying to prove claims for dishonest assistance, as the court will not permit them to adduce expert evidence of wider market practice.

Absence of claimant results in claim dismissal
Elias Neocleous & Co LLC
  • Cyprus
  • 22 January 2019

The Supreme Court recently upheld a lower court's decision to dismiss an appellant's claim in first-instance proceedings. The claimant had been the only witness in her case, but – after failing to attend the hearing on the appointed date – had requested an adjournment of the case through her lawyers on the grounds that she was unable to attend due to absence abroad for health reasons. The defendant's lawyer had not initially objected to the proposal to adjourn.

An excessive demand is still a demand – Barclays Bank plc v Price
RPC
  • United Kingdom
  • 15 January 2019

The recent decision in Barclays Bank plc v Price extends the established test that a demand made under a guarantee for an excessive amount may nevertheless be effective as a demand for what is due in circumstances where the amount that has been demanded exceeds an express liability cap. This judgment will surely be a welcome extension of the authorities relating to the operation of guarantees (and the demands made thereunder) for the creditors that benefit from such arrangements.

Email scams and related recovery litigation
RPC
  • Hong Kong
  • 15 January 2019

In a series of recent judgments, the first-instance courts in Hong Kong have demonstrated an increasing flexibility in assisting victims of internet and email fraud, including granting declaratory relief without trial. The courts' increasing willingness to grant declaratory relief without trial in these circumstances is a significant step in the right direction, as it has simplified the civil action to be taken by those affected by email fraud and similar scams.

Reasonable notice damages for wrongful dismissal cannot be determined via summary judgment
Dentons
  • Canada
  • 15 January 2019

A recent Court of Queen's Bench of Alberta decision provides clarity amidst the conflicting jurisprudential landscape regarding whether the assessment of damages for a termination without cause is appropriate for summary judgment. The court supported a master's finding that an assessment of damages for pay in lieu of reasonable notice for wrongful dismissal is inappropriate for summary judgment.

Watch out! Internal settlement negotiations may not always remain internal – West Ham v E20
RPC
  • United Kingdom
  • 08 January 2019

The Court of Appeal recently found that communications discussing a commercial proposal to settle an existing dispute are not privileged and are therefore subject to scrutiny by the court. Those engaged in litigation should take care not to commit to writing their commercial discussions on settlement and to frame their settlement discussions in terms of the legal advice that they have received on the litigation risks.

Apportionment of liability under workers' compensation scheme
Dentons
  • Canada
  • 08 January 2019

A recent case examined the apportionment of liability for damages between multiple defendants where at least one of them is statutorily immune from liability. The court considered whether an employer can be held vicariously liable for damages caused by its employee's negligence when the injured party, the employee and the employer are subject to the Workers' Compensation Act.

Amsterdam Court of Appeal declares Fortis settlement binding under WCAM
AKD NV
  • Netherlands
  • 18 December 2018

The Amsterdam Court of Appeal recently declared the settlement between Fortis (since renamed Ageas) and multiple claimant organisations binding. The €1.3 billion settlement is the largest of its kind to have been entered into in Europe. It emphasises the usefulness of the Act on Collective Settlement of Mass Claims when resolving cross-border disputes before the Dutch courts, irrespective of whether proceedings on the merits on behalf of the whole class can be litigated on in the Netherlands.

Former employees gain head start?
RPC
  • Hong Kong
  • 18 December 2018

The High Court recently considered the general legal principles for the grant of injunctive relief to protect an employer's confidential information alleged to have been taken by one or more former employees for the benefit of their new company. The outcome in the case (to date) illustrates the balance that the courts must often strike between recognising the legitimate interests of an employer and a former employee's entitlement to use their own skills and knowledge without obtaining an unfair advantage.

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