Latest updates

Qualifying shareholders' access to company records
RPC
  • Hong Kong
  • 11 December 2018

The recent decision of the High Court in Ninotre Investment Ltd v L & A International Holdings Ltd is a further example of the court's statutory power to grant a qualifying shareholder access to and inspection of company records. Section 740 of the Companies Ordinance (Cap 622) has become an established mechanism for aggrieved shareholders, with legitimate complaints in their capacity as shareholders, to obtain access to and inspection of company records.

Onus on party seeking to limit liability to provide all information at early stage
AKD NV
  • Netherlands
  • 11 December 2018

A recent decision by the Rotterdam Court regarding a major oil spill in the port of Rotterdam emphasises the importance of assessing at an early stage which liability regime applies when a party seeks to limit its exposure to claims in the event of an oil spill at sea. The court held that in procedures concerning limitation of liability, it is the responsibility of the party seeking to rely on limitation to provide all of the information available at an early stage.

When will courts grant retrospective permission for disclosed documents to be used outside main litigation?
RPC
  • United Kingdom
  • 11 December 2018

The High Court recently considered applications for retrospective permission to make collateral use of documents disclosed under a pre-action disclosure order where there had been a breach of the implied undertaking as to the use of disclosed documents. Although retrospective permission may be given, an application for permission should not be used to circumvent the usual procedure for obtaining consent to collateral use of documents.

British Columbia court looks past unregistered trading in ordering payment to investment finder
Dentons
  • Canada
  • 11 December 2018

For many junior resource company executives, deciding whether to engage investment finders can be like considering whether to breathe air. Such companies tend to have early-stage projects that do not warrant debt financing and therefore need equity injections, but lack the profile needed to attract traditional investment dealers. However, working with finders entails navigating the 'exempt' market, which can be hazardous to the ill-informed.

Supreme Court judgment on appointment of IT experts
Elias Neocleous & Co LLC
  • Cyprus
  • 04 December 2018

The Supreme Court recently issued an innovative judgment relating to Norwich Pharmacal orders which demonstrates the Cyprus courts' readiness to stay abreast of technological developments. The claimant alleged that he was the victim of fraud and conspiracy in connection with online foreign currency trading. The Supreme Court upheld the first-instance decision to appoint an independent computer expert who would provide the technical expertise required to implement the order for disclosure of the information.

Reverse engineering: Court of Appeal in rare reversal of findings of fact
  • British Virgin Islands
  • 04 December 2018

The BVI Court of Appeal recently considered the scope of its jurisdiction to interfere with findings of fact made at first instance. This is the second time in 2018 that the court has addressed this issue. While the threshold for intervention is high, the court will intervene on appropriate occasions. The thoroughness of the evaluation of evidence and the credibility of the judge's conclusions at first instance are likely to be pivotal to that determination.

Challenging judgments allegedly obtained by fraud
RPC
  • United Kingdom
  • 04 December 2018

The Court of Appeal has dismissed an application to strike out a claim for abuse of process on the basis of Summers v Fairclough in circumstances where final judgment had already been handed down. There are already established methods of challenging judgments allegedly obtained by fraud, and these should be utilised instead.

Court of appeal decides WSIB fraud requires wilful act
Dentons
  • Canada
  • 04 December 2018

The Workplace Safety and Insurance Board (WSIB) recently prosecuted three workers who were receiving WSIB benefits for failing to report a material change with respect to their benefit entitlement. The WSIB argued that it was not required to prove that the workers had intended to defraud the board. However, the Ontario Court of Appeal disagreed and held that to obtain a conviction for failing to report a material change, prosecutors must prove something akin to tax evasion or fraud.

Blockchain evidence accepted in judicial proceedings for first time
AnJie Law Firm
  • China
  • 27 November 2018

The Hangzhou Internet Court recently confirmed, for the first time, the effectiveness of evidence recorded via blockchain. Shortly after, the Supreme People's Court cemented the lower court's view by implementing the Provisions on the Trial of Cases by the Internet Courts. This is the first time that blockchain technology has been officially accepted in a judicial interpretation as a valid technical means for preserving and presenting evidence.

Some lessons in drafting for privilege claims
RPC
  • United Kingdom
  • 27 November 2018

With privilege remaining a hot topic, and with the recent SFO v ENRC decision still fresh in many legal professionals' minds, another judgment on legal advice privilege has been handed down – this time with a lesson for solicitors drafting supporting witness statements. It is of crucial importance to ensure that the utmost care is taken when making a claim to privilege, not least because the opposing party will usually have no choice other than to rely on what it is told.

Lead regulator wins landmark civil lawsuit
RPC
  • Hong Kong
  • 27 November 2018

The Securities and Futures Commission (SFC) has been using Section 213 of the Securities and Futures Ordinance (Cap 571) to good effect to secure (among other things) compensation on behalf of counterparty investors to impugned transactions. As a result of a recent landmark judgment of the Court of Final Appeal, the SFC's remit under Section 213 extends not only to (for example) insider dealing involving locally listed securities and regulated trades, but also to contraventions of Section 300.

Court hits brakes on duties owed to intoxicated plaintiffs
Dentons
  • Canada
  • 27 November 2018

The expansion of recognised duties of care owed to intoxicated persons recently met resistance from the Ontario Superior Court of Justice. The plaintiff in the case was one of four intoxicated passengers in a taxi who had been injured after the taxi was involved in an accident. The court centred its decision on the evidentiary record in the case, which established no reasonable basis for the plaintiff's expectation that the taxi driver would ensure that he wore his seatbelt.

adidas knocked out in trademark infringement case: McGregor IP maintains right to use Conor McGregor's name
AKD NV
  • Netherlands
  • 27 November 2018

The Hague District Court recently rendered an interim judgment in a matter between Dutch limited liability company McGregor IP BV and adidas. The key question in this case was whether adidas – in using the name of a sports hero on items such as hoodies, shorts and jerseys – had infringed McGregor IP's trademark rights. Notably, the outcome of this matter could have been different had the design and display of the signs at issue been different.

Administrative Court's judgment on purported changes to terms of public procurement competitions
Elias Neocleous & Co LLC
  • Cyprus
  • 20 November 2018

The Cyprus Administrative Court recently resolved the question of to which extent, if any, an action of a contracting authority can modify the published terms of the competition in a public procurement process. The court rejected the recourse filed by the applicant, which had sought to annul the decision of the Municipality of Limassol, as contracting authority, to award the contract to another tenderer.

Letter of contract versus business common sense – latest from Court of Appeal
RPC
  • United Kingdom
  • 20 November 2018

In the latest of a long line of higher court authorities debating the boundaries between black letter and more purposive approaches to contractual construction, the Court of Appeal has taken another step away from the high-water marks of the business common sense approach to contractual meaning. The decision confirms that parties are more likely to be able to work contractual machinery according to the black letter terms in which it is set out on the face of the contract.

Judge convicts and fines man for flying drone near airport
Dentons
  • Canada
  • 20 November 2018

A Canadian man was recently convicted and fined for operating his drone within 30 feet of the approach path at Yellowknife Airport. This decision clarifies that reckless drone operations near airports and populated areas will be taken seriously by the courts and that significant fines may be levied against recreational pilots.

Supreme Court of Canada to rule on what happens to pension when pensioner disappears into thin air
Dentons
  • Canada
  • 13 November 2018

The Supreme Court of Canada recently agreed to hear an appeal of a Quebec case concerning the obligations and rights of a pension plan administrator after a pensioner went missing. In their decisions, the lower courts agreed that the university had been correct to continue the monthly pension payments for the five years that the pensioner had been missing because the pensioner was presumed to be alive at the time.

Supreme Court brings final clarity to prospectus liability
Wilson Harle
  • New Zealand
  • 13 November 2018

The Supreme Court recently considered the liability of those associated with the 2004 Feltex Carpets initial public offering of shares under NZ securities legislation. The decision is a useful determination of a number of securities law liability issues in the NZ context. Among other things, it has clarified that an untrue statement for the purposes of Section 56 of the Securities Act need not be misleading to a material extent to be untrue.

Supreme Court rules on jurisdiction over protective measures
Kalliopé
  • France
  • 13 November 2018

Two recent Supreme Court decisions regarding cross-border litigation have clarified that the French courts will have jurisdiction over forensic examinations ordered as protective measures by a French judge, although foreign judges will likely have jurisdiction over the substance of the matter. In light of these judgments, the French courts are likely to order forensic measures if they are closer to the facts of the dispute even if the matter will be settled by a foreign court.

Lowering bar for inducement test in cases of fraudulent misrepresentation
RPC
  • United Kingdom
  • 13 November 2018

The test for inducement in cases of fraudulent misrepresentation is whether 'but for' the misrepresentation, the claimant 'might' have acted differently. The lower hurdle was clarified by the High Court in Nederlandse Industrie Van Eiprodukten v Rembrandt Enterprises and represents a departure from previous authorities, in which the test had been said to be whether but for the misrepresentation the claimant would have entered into the contract anyway.

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