Latest updates

Dispute resolution regulations for bunkering operations
Fenech & Fenech Advocates
  • Malta
  • 01 July 2020

Transport Malta's Ports and Yachting Directorate recently issued a port notice to remind recipients about the Dispute Resolution (Procedures) Regulation. The regulation applies to bunkering operations where a dispute has arisen between the bunkering fuel operator and provider and the receiving vessel. The procedure provides for an alternative dispute resolution mechanism that aims to be swift, economical, transparent and simple.

A city is a city but not a concrete legal venue
Arnecke Sibeth Dabelstein
  • Germany
  • 01 July 2020

Two freight forwarding companies were in dispute over the payment of freight forwarding charges in connection with a transport from Germany to the United Kingdom. After out-of-court negotiations failed, the plaintiff filed a complaint with the Duisburg Local Court. The plaintiff claimed that the local court's jurisdiction derived from its general terms and conditions, in which Duisburg was stated as the place of jurisdiction.

Judicial saga of crew wage claims
Akabogu & Associates
  • Nigeria
  • 24 June 2020

In a recent ruling concerning a claim for crew wages, the National Industrial Court held that Section 254C(1)(a) of the Constitution clearly vests the court with the exclusive jurisdiction to hear and determine civil causes and matters relating to or connected with labour, employment, trade unions or industrial relations and matters arising from the workplace. The claim in question was for N500 million in compensation for the defendant's failure to observe safety standards and procedures during a fumigation exercise.

Limitation of liability – determining the meaning of 'operator' and 'manager'
Wikborg Rein
  • United Kingdom
  • 24 June 2020

The Admiralty Court recently handed down a judgment which looked in detail at the scope and meaning of the Convention on Limitation of Liability for Maritime Claims – in particular, the meaning of the phrase "the operator of the ship" in Article 1(2). In determining the meaning of 'operator', it was also necessary for the court to examine the meaning of 'manager'. This is the first time that the English courts have been called on to consider this issue.

Vessel delays due to COVID-19: who bears the costs?
Akabogu & Associates
  • Nigeria
  • 10 June 2020

The president recently announced that only cargo vessels which have been at sea for more than 14 days can dock in Nigerian ports. The 14 days referred to by the president will start from the last port of call, which means that vessels trans-shipping in Tema or Cotonou before arriving in Nigeria will be subject to delays of at least 12 days before berthing. However, most shipowners have drafted clauses to excuse themselves and their ship from any liability arising from delays caused by COVID-19.

Deliberate recklessness of carrier in disregard of instruction
Arnecke Sibeth Dabelstein
  • Germany
  • 10 June 2020

A higher regional court recently found that a carrier had acted with wilful misconduct by disregarding a claimant's shipping order which contained a clear instruction to refrain from parking in unguarded parking spaces. Senders are well advised to give clear instructions to carriers by agreements in their contracts of carriage. If such clear instructions by the customer are not followed and damage arises, the carrier faces the reproach of wilful misconduct.

Unloading trailers: who bears responsibility under CMR?
WSCO Advokatpartnerselskab
  • Denmark
  • 20 May 2020

A recent Maritime and Commercial Court case examined a claim for damage to goods during unloading under the Convention on the Contract for the International Carriage of Goods by Road (CMR). The court found that a CMR carrier is not liable for damage in connection with the unloading of goods irrespective of whether the unloading was performed by a driver, as drivers in such instances may be deemed to act on behalf of consignees.

Notification is key: prevention principle, delay and extensions of time under shipbuilding contracts
Wikborg Rein
  • United Kingdom
  • 20 May 2020

A recent High Court decision provides an in-depth analysis of how, if at all, the prevention principle applies to shipbuilding contracts and the importance of good contract management to notify and seek extensions for events of delay. The dispute arose in the context of 11 arbitrations between a seller and a buyer concerning a series of 14 bulk carriers which were to be designed and constructed by the seller in China.

Court demands unequivocal proof of insurer's subrogation in damages suit
Kincaid | Mendes Vianna Advogados
  • Brazil
  • 13 May 2020

The São Paulo Court of Appeals recently issued a ruling in a redress lawsuit filed by an insurer against an ocean carrier, confirming the lack of proof of subrogation and disregarding the cargo survey carried out unilaterally by the insurer's surveyor. The case concerned cargo damage which had allegedly occurred during ocean carriage from Shanghai to Santos.

Limited liability of carrier's bodies in case of loss of deck cargo
Arnecke Sibeth Dabelstein
  • Germany
  • 13 May 2020

In 2018 the Hamburg Higher Regional Court ruled on a damages claim arising from the loss of deck cargo during a sea voyage. The court had to examine under what circumstances bodies acting on behalf of a carrier have acted with gross negligence where cargo goes overboard due to inadequate lashing or securing. In maritime transport, a gross organisational fault on the part of bodies acting on behalf of a carrier breaks the limitation of liability.

Ship sale and purchase transactions and acquisition of business assets: recent developments
Dardani Studio Legale
  • Italy
  • 06 May 2020

Italian law includes no specific rules concerning the sale of ships. As such, the general rules on the sale of movable assets apply. However, should the purchase of a ship qualify as an acquisition of business assets, certain mandatory rules of law apply. In two recent judgments, the Rome Court of Appeal held that the mandatory rules regarding the transfer of business assets do not apply to sale and purchase agreements concerning a single ship.

Obligation to pay compensation for damages following disruption of tram network
Arnecke Sibeth Dabelstein
  • Germany
  • 06 May 2020

The Frankfurt District Court recently ruled in a dispute between the operator of the city's tram network and the insurer of a vehicle which had parked in such a way as to block the tram tracks. The dispute concerned the plaintiff's claim for compensation for the damages that it had suffered as a result of the vehicle owner interfering in its business operations.

COVID-19 Weekly Report (27 April-3 May 2020)
International Law Office
  • International
  • 04 May 2020

The impact of COVID-19 is being felt in almost every work area across the globe. In order to keep readers abreast of this evolving situation, ILO's COVID-19 Weekly Report provides insight into the major legal developments of the past seven days, as well as a round-up of our panel of experienced international legal commentators' legislative and regulatory guidance.

Cyprus ship registry: updates on precautions for mariners in relation to COVID-19
Elias Neocleous & Co LLC
  • Cyprus
  • 29 April 2020

The Shipping Deputy Ministry recently informed the registered owners, charterers, ship managers and representatives of Cyprus-flagged ships of a number of new circular letters issued by the International Maritime Organisation. All owners and managers of Cyprus-flagged ships are advised to take note and implement the measures contained in the circular letters and the interim advice for ship operators prepared at the request of the Directorate General for Health and Food Safety.

Constitutional remedy incorrect legal tool for challenging vessel arrests
JJR Abogados
  • Chile
  • 29 April 2020

In an unprecedented action, the owners of a vessel attempted to undermine arrest measures by bringing a constitutional remedy before the Concepción Court of Appeal. The decision helps to protect the institution and procedure relating to vessel arrests and implies more certainty in terms of the outcome of such proceedings.

USCG guidelines in response to COVID-19 pandemic
Wilson Elser
  • USA
  • 29 April 2020

In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, the United States Coast Guard has released a series of marine safety information bulletins to keep the marine industry informed and provide guidance for the continued safe operation of the maritime transportation system. The bulletins detail key maritime issues associated with the COVID-19 pandemic, including reporting requirements for illness or death, vessel inspections, exams, documentation and federal drug testing requirements.

COVID-19 Weekly Report (20-26 April 2020)
International Law Office
  • International
  • 27 April 2020

The impact of COVID-19 is being felt in almost every work area across the globe. In order to keep readers abreast of this evolving situation, ILO's COVID-19 Weekly Report provides insight into the major legal developments of the past seven days, as well as a round-up of our panel of experienced international legal commentators' legislative and regulatory guidance.

Shipping Deputy Ministry extends payment deadlines due to COVID-19
Elias Neocleous & Co LLC
  • Cyprus
  • 22 April 2020

In order to support shipping companies and owners of Cyprus-flagged ships and mitigate the difficulties arising from the COVID-19 outbreak, the Shipping Deputy Ministry has extended the deadline for paying tonnage tax for Cyprus ships and the Register of Cyprus Ships annual maintenance fee to 31 May 2020. The ministry has also introduced special arrangements in order to protect public health and limit the spread of the virus.

COVID-19, voyage charterparties and force majeure
Arnecke Sibeth Dabelstein
  • Germany
  • 22 April 2020

The closure of Chinese ports due to the COVID-19 pandemic raises the question of whether and under which conditions expenses and risks charterers may cancel their voyage charterparty in the event of the closure of a port due to COVID-19. This article examines German law from the charterer's point of view and asks in particular what happens if a voyage charterparty contains no force majeure clause.

COVID-19 Weekly Report (13-19 April 2020)
International Law Office
  • International
  • 20 April 2020

The impact of COVID-19 is being felt in almost every work area across the globe. In order to keep readers abreast of this evolving situation, ILO's COVID-19 Weekly Report provides insight into the major legal developments of the past seven days, as well as a round-up of our panel of experienced international legal commentators' legislative and regulatory guidance.

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